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Leadership in times of crisis

What’s different now?

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Prof Darren Dalcher

Director, National Centre for Project Management
Lancaster University Management School

United Kingdom

 


 

We all seem to recognise that we live in changing times with rapid advances and wider interactions with nature, ecosystems, and societal concerns. For guidance and direction in such unprecedented times we turn to our leaders. Indeed, leaders are crucial to navigating and guiding organisations, especially in times of turbulence, change and uncertainty.

Deloitte’s 2019 Global Human Capital Trends Survey draws attention to the crucial role of leadership in a world characterised by disruptive digital business models, augmented workforces, flattened organisations and an ongoing shift to team-based work practices (Volini et al., 2019). The study indicates that leaders are being pressured to ‘step up and show the way forward’. Yet, the study concludes that while organisations expect new leadership capabilities to deal with the emerging challenges, they are still largely promoting traditional habits, models and mindsets—when they should be developing skills and capability, and measuring leadership in ways that enable leaders to navigate through greater ambiguity, take charge of rapid change, and engage more deeply with external and internal stakeholders.

Year after year, organizations tell us they struggle to find and develop future-ready leaders. In this year’s Global Human Capital Trends survey, 80 percent of respondents rated leadership a high priority for their organizations, but only 41 percent told us they think their organizations are ready or very ready to meet their leadership requirements.” (Volini, 2019: p.1)

And this was before the Covid-19 global crisis…

We see leadership pipelines and development at a crossroads at which organizations must focus on both the traditional and the new. Organizations know that they must develop leaders for perennial leadership skills such as the ability to manage operations, supervise teams, make decisions, prioritize investments, and manage the bottom line. And they know that they must also develop leaders for the capabilities needed for the demands of the rapidly evolving, technology-driven business environment—capabilities such as leading through ambiguity, managing increasing complexity, being tech-savvy, managing changing customer and talent demographics, and handling national and cultural differences.” (ibid.)

The Deloitte survey reports that eighty percent of respondents indicate that leadership now seems to impose unique and new requirements on organisations. These in turn suggest that new approaches are needed to manage organisations in times of change and turbulence. The new skills required from leaders are identified in Table 1.

Table 1. New leadership needs (after, Volini, 2019)

Whilst organisations have traditionally struggled to identify and develop leaders with the requisite capability, experience and motivation to address existing challenges and requirements, the enormity of new environments and contexts and the new situations that emerge present a new order of novel challenges.

May you live in interesting times

The Deloitte study refers to an intensifying combination of economic, social and political issues that appears to fundamentally challenge existing models, approaches and capabilities. Indeed, management consultant, educator and author, Peter Drucker famously observed that ‘the greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence, it is to act with yesterday’s logic’.

Approaching today’s problems with yesterday’s frames of thought and tools for action may miss the insights from both yesterday and today and ignore the emerging opportunities of tomorrow, and the operational necessity to identify potential disruptions and new players within the external environment. Strategic management thinking has thus developed an appetite for disruptive players, emerging platforms, blue ocean thinking, lean start-ups and transformational change indicating an acceptance of the transformative capability of new players and technologies, and the need to widen the scope of interest to new contexts, players and potential stakeholders, and thereby learn to encompass new opportunities.

When faced with a crisis or a new challenge, many leaders are found to be wanting. Donald Sull (2009) observes that we often respond to turbulence by accelerating activities that worked in the past. “We lapse into inertia when we should adapt with agility, and we cling to rigid dogmas when we should improvise. But throughout history, volatility has not only dethroned incumbent leaders, it has also created untold possibilities to create economic value.” (ibid., front sleeve).

 

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

How to cite this paper: Dalcher, Darren (2020). Leadership in times of crisis: What’s different now? PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/pmwj93-May2020-Dalcher-leadership-in-times-of-crisis.pdf

 


 

About the Author
 


Darren Dalcher, PhD

Author, Professor, Series Editor
Director, National Centre for Project Management
Lancaster University Management School, UK

 

 
Darren Dalcher, Ph.D., HonFAPM, FRSA, FBCS, CITP, FCMI, SMIEEE, SFHEA is Professor in Strategic Project Management at Lancaster University, and founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management (NCPM) in the UK.  He has been named by the Association for Project Management (APM) as one of the top 10 “movers and shapers” in project management and was voted Project Magazine’s “Academic of the Year” for his contribution in “integrating and weaving academic work with practice”. Following industrial and consultancy experience in managing IT projects, Professor Dalcher gained his PhD in Software Engineering from King’s College, University of London.

Professor Dalcher has written over 200 papers and book chapters on project management and software engineering. He is Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, a leading international software engineering journal. He is the editor of the book series, Advances in Project Management, published by Routledge and of the companion series Fundamentals of Project Management.  Heavily involved in a variety of research projects and subjects, Professor Dalcher has built a reputation as leader and innovator in the areas of practice-based education and reflection in project management. He works with many major industrial and commercial organisations and government bodies.

Darren is an Honorary Fellow of the APM, a Chartered Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute, and the Royal Society of Arts, A Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Member of the Project Management Institute (PMI) and the British Academy of Management. He is a Chartered IT Practitioner. He sits on numerous senior research and professional boards, including The PMI Academic Member Advisory Group, the APM Research Advisory Group, the CMI Academic Council and the APM Group Ethics and Standards Governance Board.  He is the Academic Advisor and Consulting Editor for the next APM Body of Knowledge. Prof Dalcher is an academic advisor for the PM World Journal.  He is the academic advisor and consulting editor for the forthcoming edition of the APM Body of Knowledge. He can be contacted at d.dalcher@lancaster.ac.uk.

To view other works by Prof Darren Dalcher, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/darren-dalcher/.

 

 

Project Management After Covid-19

 

INSIGHTS REPORT

 

By Ipek Sahra Ozguler

International Correspondent

Istanbul, Turkey

 


 

Coronavirus (Covid -19) has changed everything.

Our personal lives.

Our business lives.

This report brings together the useful insights of a wide number of project management leaders around the world (Belgium, India, Germany, Switzerland, Turkey, UK, USA), and provides important detail that can be used to help develop future forecasts, plans and improve decision making.


 

Time to Re-Invent Project Management

It is not the first time that the world experiences a crisis. We all remember the terrible 9/11 or the financial crisis in 2008 that swiped away millions of jobs in a matter of months. Yet, we have never experienced something similar to the coronavirus. It is unprecedented the speed and the severe impact that it has had across the world, not only on the health of millions of individuals and on the healthcare systems across the world, but also with tremendous consequences in the global economy and society at large. For which its full effects remain still unknown. The current situation is only (partially) comparable to the times of the Second World War, and the later recovery of a world devastated, through the Plan Marshall and other multi-billion reconstruction initiatives.

Leadership is always important in the tough and the good times, yet it is even more critical when a global crisis hits billions of people in a matter of weeks. And even more so when we come from some years in which leadership had lost most of its face value, where we have seen the worst face of leadership close to us: the selfishness, the hypocrisy, the manipulation, …

I firmly believe that we have a unique opportunity to both re-invent leadership and re-invent project management. That we go back to the initial values and human believes and that we improve them to address the current and future needs of our planet. And the best way to do it is through inspirational projects and strategic initiatives that will help organizations and individuals navigate through the crisis and transform to come up stronger.

From a practical and project leadership perspective, this is a unique opportunity for leaders and project managers to take action, step-up, build the competencies, and move towards a more agile organization and more straightforward project management practices and approaches.

Project management methods have tended to be too complex to be easily understood and applied by non-experts. Modern project management methods were developed primarily in the 1970s and 1980s by expert practitioners (at the beginning, mostly engineers) for practitioners (also predominantly engineers). The central assumption of the project management methods has been that documenting every aspect of a project in detail will provide a high level of control of the planned activities during the implementation of the project. Many project managers ended up producing massive numbers of documents and swathes of paperwork, leading to an overall feeling that the role was primarily administrative.

In contrast, widely used management disciplines are often linked to a few simple frameworks that can be easily understood and applied, not only by managers but also by the majority of individuals. Porter’s Five Forces and value chain analysis help to make strategy a key area for every organization to apply.

Under these circumstances, it is not surprising that we saw the rise of agile, triggered by the Agile Manifesto, written in February 2001 by 17 independent-minded software practitioners. That movement brought project management close to its end.

In late 2019, research from Gartner claimed that 80 % of today’s Project Management tasks would be eliminated by 2030 as Artificial Intelligence takes over, which we should see as a call for action to redefine the future of our profession.

If we act now, there is a good chance that project management becomes one of the most sought after skills by organizations in the new world.

 

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

How to cite this report: Ozguler, I. S. (2020). Insights Report: Project Management After Covid-19. PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Ozguler-project-management-after-covid-19-Report.pdf

 


 

About the Editor

 


Ipek Sahra Ozguler

Istanbul, Turkey

 

 

Ipek Sahra Ozguler graduated from the Istanbul University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. As a project manager, she has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014.

She has managed a variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), insurance (Euler Hermes), audit (Deloitte), telecommunication, ICT and aviation sectors and gained broader insights. In addition, she has worked as international correspondent for the PM World Journal since 2014.

Ipek is the creator and editor of the highly acclaimed book, The Perspective of Women Project Management Professionals, interviews with leading female PM experts and professionals around the world. The book was published in March 2020 and is available here.

Ipek is based in Isanbul and can be contacted at ipeksahra@gmail.com.  Her portfolio is published at the http://ipeksahra.strikingly.com/.

To view other works by Ms. Ozguler, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

 

May 2020 UK Project Management Round Up

 

Covid-19, Climate Change, the Great Crane Project, BTV (before the virus) Projects, Other Projects, Emergency Projects, Pulling Chestnuts out of the Fire and Captain Tom Moore

 

REPORT

By Miles Shepherd

Executive Advisor & International Correspondent

Salisbury, England, UK

 


 

INTRODUCTION

It is now some six weeks since UK went into lockdown and in that time the best and the worst of the British character has come into focus.  We have seen inspiring efforts from a wide range of people, ranging from small children to centenarians and from para-medicals through to senior medical staff as well as the many people who keep the supermarkets supplied with essential supplies and a host of other workers now recognised as essential – I hope we can all demonstrate our appreciation in due course..  In case you missed these, I will briefly mention some that I found particularly heart-warming a little later.

The project world has been affected by the pandemic with some projects being held back, others struggling on and a few suddenly appearing in response to the urgent needs of this country.  All these will be mentioned in this report.

I mentioned last month that here in UK, we had the great benefit that BREXIT has been pushed off the front pages but it is slowly coming back into our consciousness, if only via minor comments about lack of progress from negotiators with no wider responsibility than narrow trade interests.  Is anyone surprised at that, given the scale of other matters occupying governments around the world?  I do wonder, though, whether this a sign that we are returning to some form of normality.

For many in the project world, it is difficult to remember BTV (Before the Virus) but most people seem to have established their routines, tedious as some are finding them.  It is clear that many people are refusing to abide by the rules which is likely to prolong the need for lockdown.

This month we look at some BTV projects that have been reported despite the dominance of lockdown reportage in the media; rail seems to have been prominent while there have been some emergency projects to examine.  The strategic implications of COVID-19 will undoubtedly affect the project world so there is a review of some possibilities

CLIMATE CHANGE

It is interesting to see how many postings on social media highlight the impact of lockdown on the environment.  Levels of smog and greenhouse gases have fallen dramatically, not just in UK but all over the world.  Similarly, sea areas around places like Venice have become clean and the waters of some of India’s most polluted rivers are drinkable once more.  It is remarkable that people still cannot see the damage we do to the environment and just how we can shift the balance.  I wonder how long such improvements will last once life returns to some semblance of normality.  UK campaigners will also be cheered to learn that an official report has found that of the UK carbon footprint, half originates from goods manufactured overseas but the reduction in use of non-renewable fuels is offset by our imports.

Despite the mixed messages on the environment, it is encouraging to see that wind farms are providing a large and increasing proportion of UK energy.  Annual greenhouse gas emission fell by their largest amount in 3 years as output from wind farms output grew to a record high.  This 3.6% reduction is the 7th successive year of declining emissions.  Annual declines over the last 4 years are:

UK Sources of Energy

All this improvement in the UK climate leads on to an improvement in conditions for our fauna.  The latest project by Butterfly Conservation reports the results of their annual census with several species showing substantial increases.  Tom Brereton, associate director of monitoring and research at Butterfly Conservation, said: “The results from the 2019 season are really encouraging and provide evidence that the overall rate of decline of butterflies is slowing and for some species being reversed. Reasons for this include positive conservation through agri-environment schemes, increased woodland cover, climate warming, increases in grazing levels by wild animals and a slowing in the rate of agricultural intensification.”

Another long-term project is bearing the fruits of its labours.  In 1979, a small number of wild cranes returned to Norfolk.  Conservation groups have been working together to encourage the species, In 2010, the Great Crane Project reintroduced birds to the Somerset Levels.  Similar projects were launched in Scotland and Wales in 2012 and 2016 respectively.  The conservation project has yielded impressive results, with as many as 47 of the 56 pairs attempting to breed, raising a total of 26 chicks in England alone last year.

Common Cranes – highest recorded population in 400 years.  Image: RSPB and Nick Upton

 

More…

To read entire report, click here

 

How to cite this report: Shepherd, M. (2020).  May 2020 UK Project Management Roundup, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Shepherd-UK-Regional-Report.pdf

 


 

About the Author
 


Miles Shepherd

Salisbury, UK

 

 

Miles Shepherd is an executive editorial advisor and international correspondent for PM World Journal in the United Kingdom. He is also managing director for MS Projects Ltd, a consulting company supporting various UK and overseas Government agencies, nuclear industry organisations and other businesses.  Miles has over 30 years’ experience on a variety of projects in UK, Eastern Europe and Russia.  His PM experience includes defence, major IT projects, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, nuclear security, rail and business projects for the UK Government and EU.  Past Chair, Vice President and Fellow of the Association for Project Management (APM), Miles is also past president and chair and a Fellow of the International Project Management Association (IPMA).  He was a Director for PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre and is immediate past Chair of the ISO committee developing new international standards for Project Management and for Program/Portfolio Management.  Miles is Chair of the British Standards Institute’s Committee on Project, Programme and Portfolio Management and has been involved in the development of Uk’s BSI 6079 for more than 25 years.  He was involved in setting up APM’s team developing guidelines for project management oversight and governance.  Miles is based in Salisbury, England and can be contacted at miles.shepherd@msp-ltd.co.uk.

To view other works by Miles Shepherd, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/miles-shepherd/.

 

 

Finland Project Management Roundup for May 2020

 

Updates about Project Management Association Finland; PMI Finland Chapter; Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant; Hanhikivi 1 nuclear power plant; Helsinki’s Länsimetro extension; Raide-Jokeri light rail project

 

REPORT

By Dr Jouko Vaskimo

International Correspondent & Senior Contributing Editor

Espoo, Finland

 


 

INTRODUCTION

This roundup continues the coverage of Project Management Association Finland, PMI Finland Chapter and some of the key projects currently going on in Finland.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FINLAND

Project Management Association Finland (PMAF), Projektiyhdistys ry in Finnish, is a not-for-profit organization, and the International Project Management Association (IPMA) Member Association (MA) in Finland. Founded in 1978, PMAF promotes the interaction, project-oriented thinking, and exchange and development of practical and theoretical knowledge among project management professionals with over 4000 individual and 200 organizational members.

PMAF promotes the development and dissemination of project and project management knowledge. PMAF members are able to enjoy information sharing, workgroups, development projects, project management forums, conferences and certification services PMAF provides. PMAF organizes two annual conferences: Projektipäivät in early November and 3PMO in early June. PRY has rescheduled the 2020 3PMO event to 25.8.2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Please navigate to www.pry.fi/en , https://www.oppia.fi/events/3pmo2020/ and www.projektipaivat.fi for general information on PMAF and its annual events.

 

PMI FINLAND CHAPTER

PMI Finland Chapter is a not-for-profit organization providing project practitioners in Finland continuous learning, networking and community support. The Chapter was founded in 2005. Today, with more than 400 members, the chapter is increasingly recognized as a community where its members can enhance their project management and leadership skills, as well as network with other project management professionals.

PMI Finland Chapter hosts a number of events such as Breakfast Round Tables, regular meetings taking place once a month in Helsinki and occasionally also in other locations. The chapter members have the opportunity to attend events for free or with a discount and the chapter sends its members a regular newsletter with localized content on project management. Additionally, the Chapter supports its members in their professional development and training.

PMI Chapter Finland organizes an annual conference in the spring. The 2020 spring event – themed Modern Leadership – Project Laughs And Tears – has been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. Please navigate to www.pmifinland.org and www.conference.pmifinland.org for general information on the PMI Finland Chapter and its annual events.

 

OLKILUOTO 3

The 1 600 MW Olkiluoto 3 nuclear power plant, originally contracted to be built by consortium comprising Areva and Siemens for Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) at Olkiluoto, Finland, is facing another delay – now due to technical issues and COVID-19 pandemic. The plant was scheduled to be connected to the Finnish national power grid in November 2020, and commercial power generation was expected to commence in March 2021. At this time it is unclear how much more the start-up will be delayed.

Originally targeted for commercial power generation in June 2009, the power plant has been subject to a substantial number of challenges. In March 2018 an agreement was reached between TVO and Areva regarding the overruns in project budget and time schedule. According to TVO, Areva agreed to compensate 450 M€ assuming the power plant was fully operational by the end of 2019. If the plant was not fully operational at that time, Areva will compensate a further 400 M€. As part of the agreement, both contractual parties agreed to dispend any further judicial acts. It is unclear, whether Areva has already compensated, or will compensate the agreed 850 M€ in full.

 

More…

To read entire report, click here

 

How to cite this report: Vaskimo, J. (2020). Finland Project Management Roundup for May 2020, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-may2020-Vaskimo-Finland-Project-Management-Roundup-report.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Dr Jouko Vaskimo

Espoo, Finland

 

 

 
Jouko Vaskimo is an International Correspondent and Senior Contributing Editor for PM World in Finland. Jouko graduated M.Sc. (Tech.) from Helsinki University of Technology in 1992, and D.Sc. (Tech.) from Aalto University in 2016. He has held several project management related positions with increasing levels for responsibility. Jouko holds a number of professional certificates in the field of project management, such as the IPMA Level C (Project Manager), IPMA Level B (Senior Project Manager), PMP, PRINCE2 Foundation, and PRINCE2 Practitioner. Jouko is also a Certified Scrum Master and SAFe Agilist. Jouko is a member of the Project Management Association Finland, a founding member of PMI Finland Chapter, and the immediate past chairman of the Finnish IPMA Certification Body operating IPMA certification in Finland. Since October 2007, he has been heading the Finnish delegation to ISO/TC 258. Jouko resides in Espoo, Finland and can be best contacted at jouko.vaskimo@aalto.fi . For more information please navigate to www.linkedin.com/in/jouko-vaskimo-6285b51 .

To view other works by Jouko Vaskimo, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/jouko-vaskimo/

 

 

May 2020 PM Update from Spain

 

The COVID-19 effect in Project Management in Spain and New 2020 Challenges

 

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent

Madrid, Spain

 


 

Since last march 14th, because of the massive infection produced by the COVID-19, all Project management business activities have been obliged to use virtual platforms to move forward. Many Spanish professionals, not very familiar with that way of work, felt overwhelmed because of lack of skills and practice using these tools.

In any case, as one of the most important key skills for a good project manager is to be able to adopt, adapt and apply changes, most Spanish professionals are learning to use it successfully. In my personal case I am delivering project management consulting and training services using a virtual platfom. My customer is feeling more and more comfortable, and the the quality of service is well perceived by them. Both parts understand each other regarding the need to survive by moving forward.

On the other hand, “webinars”, video-conferences and virtual presentation offerings have proliferated, and their ads are growing on social media day by day. Business survival has generated enough professional awareness to awaken and move to deal with this horrible pandemic.

Las Puertas de Alcalá: A meaningful symbol of Madrid City

 

More…

 

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 

How to cite this report:  Bucero, A. (2020). January 2020 Project Management Update from Spain, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at: https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Spain-regional-report-ENGLISH.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Alfonso Bucero

Madrid, Spain

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, CPS, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and then nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Now he is a member of the PMIEF Engagement Committee. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 32 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010, the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011 and the PMI Eric Jenett Excellence Award on October 28th, 2017.

Mr. Bucero can be contacted at alfonso.bucero@abucero.com.

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

How to practice Agile in times of COVID-19

 

COMMENTARY

By Aina Aliieva

Vancouver, BC, Canada

 


 

This is the first time in a history of humanity when the whole world is dealing with the same problem, discussing the same news and complaining about ruined plans. Same as others, I also had many plans for this spring. I planned to finally go back to my hometown after 6 years of living abroad, participate in a couple of conferences and learn salsa. Even now I had completely different plans for this long Easter weekend rather then writing this article. But life is unpredictable and that’s why I love it.

Coming to Canada around 5 years ago I learnt the term “Agile”. The initial meaning of this term is “able to move quickly and easily.” There is a specific meaning if we talk about the style of work in the organization: “a method of project management, used especially for software development, that is characterized by the division of tasks into short phases of work and frequent reassessment and adaptation of plans.” Having understood that I had an agile mindset a long time before I learned this word, I was inspired to use agility not just in a work environment but in personal planning. I wrote a couple of articles about agile in personal planning, spoke at several events and conferences and even started writing a book. However, nowadays I have a chance to be agile, adaptable and flexible not just at work and personal planning but in my life in general.

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The first sign of agility and flexibility is how quickly I can adapt to new circumstances and reprioritize my goals and activities under the present situation. From time to time during the retrospectives with my teams at work I ask 2 questions:

 “What we can control?”, “What we can’t control?”

We write a list of obstacles and then identify if we can control it or not. If there is something out of our control, so why not just accept the reality and adapt. For example, nowadays I can’t control the COVID spreading or length of quarantine. So, the option I have is just admitting the reality and live according to it. The other question is what I can control. There are so many things under my control, so why not concentrate on them?!

  • I can control my emotions, reactions and mindfulness
  • I can control my attitude
  • I can keep following my habits while working from home, such as wake up early, dress up and so on
  • I can’t control the amount of upsetting news I read per day

I can keep writing items for my list, but I think the idea is clear.

Another question I like to ask myself is “What challenges do I have?”.  “Challenges” is a different word from “blockers” or something which is completely out of my control. “Challenges” means that there is something on my way which makes it more difficult but not impossible. For example, I do public speaking. I love it. But I always do it face to face with the audience and have never done it online. So, now my challenge is to learn how to do webinars and deliver information without having constant eye contact with people.

As some of you already guessed it is not enough just to identify challenges. It is important to create a plan on how I can overcome them. So, my next question is: “How to overcome the challenges I have?” For example, to overcome a challenge of delivering information using a different style on webinars might be to be better prepared to make sure that I know exactly who my audience is, are they multicultural people or is it just one culture, to use examples related to this specific audience and prepare jokes keeping in mind the cultural adjustments.

 

More…

To read entire article, click here

 

How to cite this article: How to cite this article: Aliieva, A. (2020). How to practice Agile in times of COVID-19; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Aliieva-how-to-practice-agile-in-times-of-covid-19.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Aina Aliieva

Vancouver, BC, Canada

 

 

Aina Aliieva is a Scrum Master with 4 years of experience in Project Management and 4 years in an Agile environment.  She is also CEO and instructor in Bee Agile Tutoring. She teaches Project Management, Agile and goal setting for organizations around the world. She has managed and consulted on projects for the technical, construction, and engineering disciplines.

Aina has a Masters’s degree in electrical engineering and an MBA in technology. She has PMP and PMI-ACP certificates.

Aina is an active member of PMI CWCC (Canadian West Coast Chapter), PMI Ukraine Chapter and UAE PMI. She is also a Program Manager, Disciplined Agile in PMI CWCC.

Aina is an experienced public speaker and coach. She also helps in personal planning and setting up goals.

In her free time, Aina participates in different mentorship programs, speaks at webinars and interviews people for her personal blog.

She can be contacted at https://www.linkedin.com/in/aina-aliieva/

 

 

What it takes to be creative and innovative

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Angelica Larios, MBA, PMP

Mexico City, Mexico

 


 

Innovation and creativity

Innovation and creativity are topics in vogue; everybody seems to be somehow interested in being creative and innovative. With so many examples such as Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg, it seems like innovation is a gift and that becoming the next king of the new invention comes naturally and comfortably. The truth is that no matter how easy the innovation process appears to be or is presented in front of our eyes, there is a story behind every product, service, or leader that has transform life as we know it.

Innovation implies the adoption of a new idea, new procedure or behavior, or a mix of all elements described. Innovation can be put in place from different angles, such as technical innovations that include a new process and new products or services, or administrative changes referring to new procedures, policies, and organizational forms according to Jiménez. For any organization, innovation represents the opportunity not only to grow and survive but also to influence the direction of the industry significantly. Innovation is not only a weapon in competitive markets, but it can also turn out into social change or social entrepreneurship, says Davila et al.

Project managers find very fertile land to manage innovation projects; one way is helping the business growing; another way is supporting the community and social changes.

Creativity, on the other hand, “according to expert Michalko, is not an accident, not genetically determined. It is not a result of some easily learned magic trick or secret, but a consequence of your intention to be creative and your determination to learn and use creative thinking strategies.” Following it will be presented ways to learn how to be more innovative and how to incorporate into project management practice.

The source of innovation comes from different paths

Hard-working in a specific direction. – Innovators select a problem to focus all their attention and energy to solve, pass much time thinking in several solutions or possibilities to resolve their issues, and when they have this instinct, then start the experimental phase. “The majority of innovations come from dedicated people in a field working hard to solve a well-defined problem, asserts Berkun.” Innovate in our daily projects will also require a focus on common problems and how certain aspects can be improved.

The shift in the first direction – Often innovators could become stubborn enough to what they want to accomplish, and its resilience makes them work almost restlessness. However, when the first direction seems far away, and they “discover” something useful in the middle of their way, they start analyzing if this invention can be helpful for others. This way, while working in pursuing original idea can turn into something exciting and practical to use. Project managers by nature can sometimes be stubborn; however, it is essential to be flexible enough to understand that in the way of trying to solve a problem, the solution can emerge.

Curiosity – This motivator is like an internal motor; this innate need to know everything, to be curious about the world around us, how things are made, how things can be undone, and the challenge of trying to re-build some items with old pieces. Curiosity comes for the urge to know something new, passing the time, or just having fun. This way, many things have been discovered or invented, as creativity can be unlimited for a curious mind. Curiosity becomes an essential driver not only for innovation but also for understanding context, relations, and complexity involved in the project environment.

Wealth and money – Another source of innovation is located on the opposite spectrum. People that feel the need for recognition or power or both. This is often the case where what they are searching for is more related to status and money rather than creating and building something new. Some examples in history came for people more skilled in business or entrepreneurship rather than the genius that wanted to solve problems.

 

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How to cite this article:  How to cite this article: Larios, A. (2020). What it takes to be creative and innovative, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Larios-what-it-takes-to-be-creative-and-innovative.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Angelica Larios

Mexico City, Mexico

 

Angelica Larios, MBA, PMP, is a project manager with more than 20 years of experience in implementing software projects related to business intelligence, planning and budgeting, and financial consolidation solutions based on software applications to support the business decision process. She is the owner of ALACONTEC, an I.T. consulting company founded in Latin America. She has held several professional positions in private and public organizations, such as the Health Ministry in Mexico as I.T. director, and as a business manager for several firms in Mexico.

She holds a master’s degree in business administration and a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the National University of Mexico (UNAM). In addition to her studies in project management and her Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification, which have helped her to consolidate her career and have a better understanding of what businesses and projects need nowadays. She is a doctoral student in strategic leadership at Regent University, VA. She is a volunteer since 2007, starting in the local Mexico chapter, being Past President and in several positions within PMI (CMAG, BVAC) and currently serves on the Ethics Member Advisory Group (EMAG) that supports the PMI Global Operations (2018–2020).

Angelica can be contacted at angelica.larios@gmail.com

 

 

Reducing Construction Cost

of Extra High Voltage Substations

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By Mosab Elbashir MSc, PE, PMP, CQE ASQ

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

 


 

Aim

This article aims to present some ideas to reduce the cost in substations construction projects based on the experience and best practices. The article emphasizes constructing a systematic model for cost reduction based on the value chain; it also presents different approaches for cost reduction by focusing mainly on the civil scope.

Value chain

The value chain model serves as a tool to sustain the cost reduction and embed this goal into the system in order to reach a more strategic approach rather than isolated one stand initiative.

Figure 1 Value Chain

The basic definition of the project that, it is a unique and, has beginning and end date. The uniqueness of the project means there is always some unique requirements for each project, by realizing these requirements the design parameters must be considered. In the above value chain figure the system requirements and, restriction for each project should be known to help in determining the electrical design parameters required for that project, subsequently the physical requirements to accommodate the electrical equipment are determined. The operation requirement should also be gathered based on the full picture rather than accumulating the spare parts or providing training without reasonable needs. Imbedding this value chain into the system will help in realizing the actual requirements and subsequently cut off the cost automatically by eliminating the redundant activities and materials.

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How to cite this article: Elbashir, M. (2020).  Reducing construction Cost of Extra High Voltage Substations, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Elbashir-reducing-construction-cost-of-high-voltage-substations.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Eng. Mosab Elbashir

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

 


 

Eng. Mosab Elbashir Msc, PMP, PE, CQE ASQ, Professional construction engineer and project management expert with 17 years of experience. Graduated from University of Khartoum (Sudan), engineering faculty, civil engineer department in 2003 (BSc). Obtained Master’s degree from Lund University (Sweden) in Water Resources in 2007. Certified quality engineer from American Society of Quality (CQE ASQ) and professional project manager (PMP –PMI). Currently works as a consultant project engineer with Saudi Electricity Company in Saudi Arabia, since 2012. Interested in projects management. For more information, please visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/mosab-elbashir-44595a64/

Mosab can be contacted at email: mosab_555@hotmail.com

 

 

Tips for Working at Home

 

ADVISORY ARTICLE

By John Cable, Director

Project Management Center for Excellence
A. James Clark School of Engineering
University of Maryland

College Park, Maryland, USA

 


 

If you are generally new to working from home on a full-time basis, we at the University of Maryland’s Project Management Center for Excellence have put together a few ideas that may be useful.

Routine

It is best to develop a schedule and routine that works for you. Treat the day like a workday and get up on time, dress for the office (even if it is casual) and try to keep a regular schedule.

  • Plan your day to work with your natural energy cycle. We all have one and they are different. Maybe you are a morning person or a night owl or something in between. Your curve may look something like this:

In any case, schedule your focused work during your peak energy cycle and do things that require less focus during low energy times. This is a natural cycle but can be influenced by diet and exercise. Eat some protein when you need to push through a low energy time to finish a task.

  • Take breaks at whatever interval works for you, even if it’s just getting a fresh coffee and walking around the house for a minute.
  • Be sure to change your field of vision and focal length when you take a break. If you are sitting at a computer doing your work, make sure to look out the window or go outside so you are looking at a distance.
  • Forget the 8-10 hour typical day in the office and don’t be afraid to take breaks for personal things you need to get done. Working from home means you actually have a much longer workday!
  • Stay in contact with work colleagues and friends by scheduling video conferences. We actually do virtual cocktail parties with friends a few times a week to stay in touch and schedule regular “catch-ups” with work colleagues.
  • Coordinate with family members so they understand and accommodate.

 

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How to cite this article: Cable, J. H. (2020). Tips for Working at Home, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Cable-tips-for-working-at-home2.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


John Cable

Director, Project Management Center for Excellence
University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

 

 

John Cable is Director of the Project Management Center for Excellence in the A.James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, where he is also a professor and teacher of several graduate courses in project management. His program at the University of Maryland offers masters and PhD level programs focused on project management. With more than 1,300 seats filled annually with students from many countries, including more than 40 PhD students, the program is the largest graduate program in project management at a major university in the United States.

John Cable served in the newly formed U.S. Department of Energy in 1980, where he was involved with developing energy standards for buildings, methods for measuring energy consumption, and managing primary research in energy conservation.  As an architect and builder, Mr. Cable founded and led John Cable Associates in 1984, a design build firm. In 1999 he was recruited by the University of Maryland’s Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering to create and manage a graduate program in project management. In his role as founder and director of the Project Management Center for Excellence at Maryland, the program has grown to offer an undergraduate minor, master’s degrees, and a doctoral program. Information about the Project Management Center for Project Management at the University of Maryland can be found at www.pm.umd.edu.

In 2002, PMI formed the Global Accreditation Center for Project Management Educational Programs (GAC).  Mr. Cable was appointed to that inaugural board where he served as vice chair.  In 2006, he was elected as chairman, a role he held through 2012.  As Chair of the PMI GAC, John led the accreditation of 86 project management educational programs at 40 institutions in 15 countries in North America, Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the Asia Pacific Region. John was awarded PMI’s 2012 Distinguished Contribution Award for his leadership at the GAC.  He can be contacted at jcable@umd.edu.

To view other works by John Cable, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/john-cable/

 

 

Converting to Online Teaching

A series of short guidance articles for educators and institutions

 

Introduction to the Series

 

SERIES ARTICLE

By John Cable, Director

Project Management Center for Excellence
A. James Clark School of Engineering
University of Maryland

College Park, Maryland, USA

 


 

Since erupting in China in December 2019, the Coronavirus (Covid-19) disease has spread worldwide to become the most serious international pandemic since the Spanish Flu in 1918. Following devastating outbreaks in Italy, South Korea and other countries earlier in the year, the disease reached the United States in late January 2020.  As infections began to spread rapidly, various city and state leaders took action, issuing stay-at-home orders, shutting down businesses and services, and accelerating various containment strategies.  By early March 2020, a nation-wide emergency was in full swing.

Schools were some of the first activities to shut down in order to control the spread of the virus. Some U.S. universities were early to recognize the risks and to react, closing campuses, sending students home and converting courses to online instruction.  On March 12, 2020, the University of Maryland (UMD) shut down for three weeks; that closure was extended on March 30th through the end of the current semester, with many courses converted to virtual versions. (There is still some uncertainty as to whether the campus will reopen for the Fall Semester in late August). The UMD’s A. James Clark School of Engineering and the Project Management Center for Excellence were no exceptions. We are now conducting all courses online. In addition, our annual Project Management Symposium scheduled for 7-8 May 2020 has also been converted to a virtual event.

Fortunately, we have been developing and conducting virtual courses and training activities since 2006, with full videoconferencing capabilities, and easily made the switch to all online courses in a relatively short amount of time. It occurred to me that it might be useful to share some of the guidelines and processes that we have developed over the last fourteen years for our faculty, guest instructors and staff for converting to teaching online. Since we have partnered with the PM World Journal (PMWJ) for many years, it was an obvious vehicle for sharing this information.

Over the next several months, a series of short articles in the PMWJ will provide guidance on how to convert to virtual teaching, create and conduct videoconferences, and implement blended learning experiences, based on our experiences at UMD. But first, some additional background.

 

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Editor’s note: This series of articles by the Director of the University of Maryland’s Project Management Center for Excellence provides information and advice for converting from traditional in-person classes to online teaching, based on their experience before and during the Covid-19 pandemic of 2020. See Professor Cable’s background at the end of this article.

How to cite this paper: How to cite this paper: Cable, J. H. (2020). Converting to Online Teaching: A series of short guidance articles for educators and institutions – Introduction, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Cable-converting-to-teaching-online-1-introduction.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


John Cable

Director, Project Management Center for Excellence
University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

 

 

 
John Cable is Director of the Project Management Center for Excellence in the A.James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, where he is also a professor and teacher of several graduate courses in project management. His program at the University of Maryland offers masters and PhD level programs focused on project management. With more than 1,300 seats filled annually with students from many countries, including more than 40 PhD students, the program is the largest graduate program in project management at a major university in the United States.

John Cable served in the newly formed U.S. Department of Energy in 1980, where he was involved with developing energy standards for buildings, methods for measuring energy consumption, and managing primary research in energy conservation.  As an architect and builder, Mr. Cable founded and led John Cable Associates in 1984, a design build firm. In 1999 he was recruited by the University of Maryland’s Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering to create and manage a graduate program in project management. In his role as founder and director of the Project Management Center for Excellence at Maryland, the program has grown to offer an undergraduate minor, master’s degrees, and a doctoral program. Information about the Project Management Center for Project Management at the University of Maryland can be found at www.pm.umd.edu.

In 2002, PMI formed the Global Accreditation Center for Project Management Educational Programs (GAC).  Mr. Cable was appointed to that inaugural board where he served as vice chair.  In 2006, he was elected as chairman, a role he held through 2012.  As Chair of the PMI GAC, John led the accreditation of 86 project management educational programs at 40 institutions in 15 countries in North America, Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the Asia Pacific Region. John was awarded PMI’s 2012 Distinguished Contribution Award for his leadership at the GAC.  He can be contacted at jcable@umd.edu.

To view other works by John Cable, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/john-cable/

 

 

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