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Program Management and Events of Scale

 

Personal Perspective

 

SECOND EDITION

By Bob Prieto

Jupiter, Florida, USA

 


 

Since early 2001, I have observed the impact of a series of high-profile events of scale. These events of scale have encompassed both manmade as well as naturally occurring events and the lessons outlined below are derived from a systems perspective and are to a large degree independent of the initiating event. Much has been written about individual events, the failures and successes in being prepared, the lessons learned in the immediate aftermath and the challenges during recovery.

This paper looks more broadly, focusing on programmatic features common in our preparation and planning to resist, respond and recover from these events. Careful consideration may improve our overall infrastructure resiliency and improve outcomes in the future. Table 1 summarizes my perspective in observing each of these events and to the extent possible the lessons learned have been grouped into three phases of resiliency:

– Resist phase

– Respond phase

– Recover phase

Clearly the list is not all encompassing but provides a starting point and framework for future development.

Where My Involvement Began

Maybe it was the high-altitude air and snow-covered mountains of Davos, Switzerland or perhaps the eclectic collection of people from around the world that inspired nobler ideas. But whether from within or without, I came to a crossroads that very much changed how I thought about many things in life. How I perceived the world, or more specifically the infrastructure systems that enabled the day-to-day functioning of the world we live in, changed in several fundamental ways.

That day was January 26, 2001 and the Governors of the Engineering & Construction community of the World Economic Forum were due to have their annual meeting. Traditionally, this meeting was a time to renew global friendships and make new ones. But this day was different. We awoke to the news that Gujarat, India, had experienced a terrible earthquake the night before, with widespread failures in buildings and supporting infrastructure.

We also awoke to find one of our members from India exhausted from a sleepless night on the telephone trying to mobilize the heavy equipment and other resources he had to respond to this horrific tragedy and to his anger and frustration that “doing the right thing” was hampered by the lack of an efficient way for these new first responders, engineers and constructors, to engage with the public sector.

 

It was out of this frustration and perhaps the thin air of the Swiss mountains that the Disaster Resource Network (originally called Engineers without Borders in those early days) or DRN was first conceived. Later we were to come to learn that at the same time in another hotel in Davos, the Transportation and Logistics Governors were arriving at the very same conclusion.

 

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Second Editions are previously published papers that have continued relevance in today’s project management world, or which were originally published in conference proceedings or in a language other than English.  Original publication acknowledged; authors retain copyright.  This paper was originally published in PM World Today in July 2008.  It is republished here with the author’s permission.

How to cite this paper: Prieto, R. (2008). Personal Perspective: Program Management and Events of Scale, Second Edition, PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May 2020.  Originally published in PM World Today, July 2008. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Prieto-program-management-and-events-of-scale-2nd-ed.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Bob Prieto

Chairman & CEO
Strategic Program Management LLC
Jupiter, Florida, USA

 

 

 Bob Prieto is a senior executive effective in shaping and executing business strategy and a recognized leader within the infrastructure, engineering and construction industries. Currently Bob heads his own management consulting practice, Strategic Program Management LLC.  He previously served as a senior vice president of Fluor, one of the largest engineering and construction companies in the world. He focuses on the development and delivery of large, complex projects worldwide and consults with owners across all market sectors in the development of programmatic delivery strategies. He is author of nine books including “Strategic Program Management”, “The Giga Factor: Program Management in the Engineering and Construction Industry”, “Application of Life Cycle Analysis in the Capital Assets Industry”, “Capital Efficiency: Pull All the Levers” and, most recently, “Theory of Management of Large Complex Projects” published by the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) as well as over 600 other papers and presentations.

Bob is an Independent Member of the Shareholder Committee of Mott MacDonald. He is a member of the ASCE Industry Leaders Council, National Academy of Construction, a Fellow of the Construction Management Association of America and member of several university departmental and campus advisory boards. Bob served until 2006 as a U.S. presidential appointee to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Business Advisory Council (ABAC), working with U.S. and Asia-Pacific business leaders to shape the framework for trade and economic growth.  He had previously served as both as Chairman of the Engineering and Construction Governors of the World Economic Forum and co-chair of the infrastructure task force formed after September 11th by the New York City Chamber of Commerce. Previously, he served as Chairman at Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB) and a non-executive director of Cardn0 (ASX)

Bob can be contacted at rpstrategic@comcast.net.

 

 

Evaluation of Socio-Political factors

responsible for the energy poverty in Sub-Sahara Africa

 

FEATURED PAPER

Dr. Reuben A Okereke, Tobechi B. Ejekwu, Victor O. Ohamma

Department of Quantity Surveying
Imo State University

Owerri, Nigeria

 


 

ABSTRACT

Poverty is the most fundamental reality of developing countries and the energy consumption patterns of poor people tend to add to their misery and aggravate their poverty. A direct improvement in energy services would allow the poor to enjoy both short-term and long-term advances in living standards. Required are energy strategies based on increasing the use of energy carriers other than biomass, or on using biomass in modern ways. Poverty alleviation and development depend on universal access to energy services that are affordable, reliable, and of good quality. For many years now, Nigeria as one of the Sub Saharan Countries has been facing extreme electricity shortage. This deficiency is multi-faceted, with causes that are financial, structural, and sociopolitical, none of which are mutually exclusive. For the purposes of this paper, after searching through copious amounts of literature, I was able to flesh out most of the financial and structural issues. With only this perspective, we naively attempted to compare cost projections for rural electrification, including both grid extension and decentralized methods. The projected costs are high but not so prohibitive as the current electrification statistics would suggest. We realized that there must be some aspect of the problem that cannot be reflected through numbers and official policies. The goal of this paper is not to solve the energy crisis of Sub Saharan Africa, but rather to introduce the depth and complexity of the issues involved. In the appendix, we describe various strategies that could be used to address the solution. The energy situation in Nigeria is quite different from that of the United States and other more developed countries. Yet alleviation of the global energy crisis will require a coordinated effort on the part of many nations. Thus, it is important to have a general understanding of the nature of problems in areas of the world less familiar to westerners.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

Human society cannot survive without a continuous use, and hence supply, of energy. The original source of energy for social activities was human energy—the energy of human muscle provided the mechanical power necessary at the dawn of civilization. Then came the control and use of fire from the combustion of wood, and with this, the ability to exploit chemical transformations brought about by heat energy, and thereby to cook food, heat dwellings, and extract metals (bronze and iron). The energy of flowing water and wind was also harnessed. The energy of draught animals began to play a role in agriculture, transport, and even industry. Finally, in rapid succession, human societies acquired control over coal, steam, oil, electricity, and gas. Thus from one perspective, history is the story of the control over energy sources for the benefit of society.

Modern economies are energy dependent, and their tendency has been to see the provision of sufficient energy as the central problem of the energy sector. Indeed, the magnitude of energy consumed per capita became an indicator of a country’s ‘modernization’ and progress. Energy concerns have long been driven by one simple preoccupation: increasing the supply of energy. Over the past few decades, however, serious doubts have arisen about the wisdom of pursuing a supply-obsessed approach. Attention is shifting towards a more balanced view that also looks at the demand side of energy. But access to, and the use of, energy continues to be a necessary and vital component of development.

Energy poverty in Africa calls for priority attention from the international community. Indeed, the region’s energy needs are huge, particularly in sub Saharan Africa, which has the lowest rate of electrification in the world – less than 30 percent, according to the UNDP Human Development Report 2007/2008. This rate is all the more unacceptable, when one realizes that the estimated population of sub-Saharan Africa is 16 percent of the world total. The sub-region depends largely on inefficient traditional biomass, used mainly for cooking and water-heating in households. Traditional biomass accounts for over 80 percent of primary energy demand. These sources of energy (firewood, charcoal and animal dung, for instance) burn inefficiently and give off noxious fumes, which can cause serious respiratory disease and even death. The surrounding environment is also degraded, through the depletion of forest resources…

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How to cite this paper: Author last name, first initial (2020). Evaluation of Socio-Political factors responsible for the energy poverty in Sub-Sahara Africa; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Okereke-Ejekwu-Ohamma-socio-economic-factors-for-energy-poverty-in-sub-sahara-africa.pdf

 


 

About the Authors

 


Dr. Reuben A. Okereke

Owerri, Nigeria

 

 

 

Q.S. Dr. Reuben A. Okereke, PhD QS & Sust. Dev., MSc. Const. Mgt., MSc. Env. Res. Mgt., FRQS, FIIA, FAPM, ACArb, CIPM, MAACEI., is a multi-talented and erudite scholar. A versatile professional with academic qualifications in Quantity Surveying, Project Management, Construction Management and Environmental Resource Management. His Quantity Surveying professional experience of almost three decades spans through his employment with consultancy and construction firms in Lagos, Nigeria, work as Project Manager in the Bank for eight years, services as in-house consultant Quantity Surveyor for several years for the Imo State University Owerri, Nigeria, experience as Consultant Quantity Surveyor in private practice as well as several years of teaching in both the University and Polytechnic. He is currently serving his second term as the head of department of Quantity Surveying, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria. He can be contacted at  raphicaben2013@gmail.com

 


Tobechi B. Ejekwu

Owerri, Nigeria

 

 

Tobechi B. Ejekwu is a registered member of the Nigerian institute of Quantity Surveyors. He obtained his first degree in Quantity Surveying from the Imo State University Owerri, Imo State University, Nigeria with Second Class Upper Division. He bagged A Master’s Degree in Quantity Surveying from the same University with Upper credit. He is currently studying for a PhD in Quantity Surveying with interest in Life Cycle Costing of residential Buildings. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Quantity Surveying, Imo State, Owerri, Nigeria. He is an experienced Quantity Surveyor with industry footprint in many high profiled projects. Tobechi can be contacted at tobejekwu@gmail.com.

 


Victor O. Ohamma

Owerri, Nigeria

 

 

 

Victor O. Ohamma is a Probationer member of the Nigerian institute of Quantity Surveyors. He obtained his first degree in Quantity Surveying from the Imo State University Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria in 2009. He bagged Master’s Degree in Quantity Surveying from the same University with Upper credit. He is currently studying for PhD in Quantity Surveying with interest in achieving sustainable energy in Nigeria through photovoltaic (PV) technology; problems and prospects. He is an experienced Quantity Surveyor with industry footprint in many high profiled projects. Victor can be contacted at likemindz4good@yahoo.com

 

 

Circles of Corruption in the Global Construction Industry

and Suggestions for its Mitigation and Elimination Including the Use of Enterprise Risk Management

 

FEATURED PAPER

By O. Chima Okereke, PhD

Nigeria & UK

 


 

According to a paper published in January 2017, entitled: “Why is Construction so Prone to Corruption?” by LetsBuild, a large software company in the construction industry, the total global construction market was estimated as $3.2 trillion per annum [1]. It was claimed that losses to corruption in the industry amount to 10-30% of the total market revenue.

Construction industry has been identified as the most corrupt sector in the world. Transparency International describes construction as an industry with characteristics that render it prone to corruption. It occurs in various manifestations in business, economics, politics, etc., it is blamed for most things that are badly handled in the industry. Whenever there is a failure of a public project, the first reaction is to suspect corruption as the reason for it. This is the assumption even before the failure is investigated. According to Transparency International, corruption could be defined as “the abuse of entrusted power for private gain” [2].

When talking about developing countries, corruption is a term that appears as one of the factors responsible for the apparently enduring underdevelopment. It is certainly the case that the construction industry is one of the industries where corruption features unhelpfully. Sadly, Africa has suffered a lot at the hands of corrupt individuals and organized crimes. Some companies for instance, allegedly pay top African government officials to receive tenders which have brought the construction industry into disrepute [3].  However, there are examples, cited in this paper, that make the point that corruption in the construction industry is a global affair and not confined to one continent.

In preparing this paper, a graphical representation has been produced of Circles of Corruption in the Global Construction Industry. The essence of preparing this network of circles of corruption in the global construction industry is to present the problems at a glance, that is on a page. It is hoped that the graphical presentation should make an impact on the reader who could be a project team member, a project manager, a project director or any other project stakeholder. An impact that could help elicit an interest in trying to eliminate some of the problems. It is thought that summarising the corrupt practices and failings may help to underscore the enormity and global spread of the problems which respect no geographical boundaries or national advancement in technological development. As will be seen with examples, corruption shows its unacceptable face in various forms in developed and underdeveloped nations alike.

In the first section of this paper, a graphical presentation of the circles of corruption in the global construction industry is given. Some examples of where they occur are discussed with reasons why they thrive. Suggestions for their mitigation are made in the second section while the use of Enterprise Risk Management is recommended in the last section.

Some examples of Circles of Corruption

Circles of Corruption and some reasons why they thrive in the construction industry

  • Inflation of costs: The industry produces large infrastructures which are capital intensive. The greater the size of the fund, the greater the chances of inflation of costs.
  • Corruption from the uniqueness and complexity of large projects: Large projects are generally unique such that there are unfamiliar areas which may be exploited for illegal personal gains. In addition, there may be hundreds of contractors engaged; interactions are so many that they constitute avenues for corrupt dealings. Besides, the companies may have multiple job sites, numerous employees, and multiple suppliers such the owners may not be able to monitor and regulate them [1].

 

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How to cite this paper: Okereke, O. C. (2020). Circles of Corruption in the Global Construction Industry and Suggestions for its Mitigation and Elimination Include the Use of Enterprise Risk Management; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Okereke-circles-of-corruption-in-global-construction-industry.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


O. Chima Okereke, PhD, PMP

Herefordshire, UK

 

 

Dr. O. Chima Okereke, Ph.D., MBA, PMP is the Managing Director and CEO of Total Technology Consultants, Ltd., a project management consulting company working in West Africa and the UK.  He is a visiting professor, an industrial educator, a multidisciplinary project management professional, with over 25 years’ experience in oil and gas, steel and power generation industries. For example, On December 26th 2013, he completed an assignment as a visiting professor in project management; teaching a class of students on Master’s degree in project management in the Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia.  In August and September 2013, he conducted an innovative, and personally developed training programme for seventy six well engineers of Shell Nigeria to enhance the efficiency of their operations using project and operations management processes.

Before embarking on a career in consulting, he worked for thirteen years in industry rising to the position of a chief engineer with specialisation in industrial controls and instrumentation, electronics, electrical engineering and automation. During those 13 years, he worked on every aspect of projects of new industrial plants including design, construction and installation, commissioning, and engineering operation and maintenance in process industries.  Chima sponsored and founded the potential chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, acting as president from 2004 to 2010.

Dr. Okereke has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Lagos, and a PhD and Masters in Business Administration (MBA) degree from the University of Bradford in the UK.  He also has a PMP® certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) which he passed at first attempt.  He has been a registered engineer with COREN in Nigeria since 1983.  For many years, Total Technology has been a partner for Oracle Primavera Global Business Unit, a representative in Nigeria of Oracle University for training in Primavera project management courses, and a Gold Level member of Oracle Partner Network (OPN. He is a registered consultant with several UN agencies.  More information can be found at http://www.totaltechnologyconsultants.org/.

Chima is the publisher of Project Management Business Digest, a blog aimed at helping organizations use project management for business success.  Dr. Okereke is also an international editorial advisor for the PM World Journal. He can be contacted at chima.okereke@totaltechnologyconsultants.com   or info@totaltechnologyconsultants.org.

 To view other works by Dr. O. Chima Okereke, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/dr-o-chima-okereke/

 

 

Change of Use

Caustic factors, reasons for low demand of purpose built commercial real estate projects and conversion to residential real estate projects in Ajegunle Oyo, Atiba L.G.A., Oyo State

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Christian Osita Ifediora

Department of Estate Management
Ajayi Crowther University Oyo

Oyo State, Nigeria

 


 

ABSTRACT

The study examined the factors responsible for conversion of purpose built commercial real estate projects (shopping complex) to residential real estate projects (self-contained accommodations). The identified projects are within Ajegunle community and are can be through Ajegunle Yidi road Oyo, the study identified location, which is predominantly rural and agrarian, income of the locals which is relatively low and absence of other commercially viable ventures as reasons why there is low demand of the purpose built commercial real estate projects  and increase in demand for self-contained accommodations, absence of ready intending occupants, presence of tertiary institutions like ACU and FSS, desire for privacy and location as factors responsible for the conversion from commercial to residential accommodation. The findings indicated that location was critical as it is part of the identified reasons and as well as identified factor, as it was ranked highest as factor responsible for conversion. The study advised that developers (investors) need to seek professional advice on property development and should pay attention to the identified reasons and factors to avoid embarking on projects that will not attract the expected patronage.

Key words: Factors, conversion, commercial, residential, real estate project.

INTRODUCTION

Investment in any real estate development requires careful study and needs experts’ advice for investors to really make the right choice and invest properly. This is particularly true because investment in real estate involves huge capital outlay. For investors to make meaningful decision on the choice and best in addition sustainable decision, one needs a careful study of the prevailing conditions and market situations within the area he or she intends to invest in any real estate project. A real estate investor does not need real estate project only for non-profit like prestige, social status etc. but for financial returns that may come in form of rent or proceeds from sale.

If a real estate project is to be developed for any for any use say residential, commercial etc, certain factors must be considered especially as it relates to the location, issues of demand, income of the prospecting users or to whom it is intended for and so on. It is not just enough to embark on real estate development without a corresponding study of the market forces (conditions) hence intending developers needs experts like Estate Surveyors to advice on the likely markets condition/forces that will play or prevalent within the locality the developers intends to site or develop their real estate project.

It is not good to venture into real estate project with intention to make return only for the real estate project developed to remain unoccupied for years, thus void is what experts tries to avoid as this ties down the capital invested on the project. In this study, there has been clear evidence that purpose built commercial real estate projects remained unoccupied for years thus leading decision to change the use. The investors believe this actions/decision will help attract tenants to the property.

This work however looks at the issues of conversion of purpose built commercial real estate projects (complex) to residential self-contained accommodation as evidence abound which attest to the fact that these real estate projects could not attract tenant and could not be let before the investors took  decision of converting them to self-contained accommodations (residential real estate). Moreso, it looked at the reasons why there was poor demand for purpose built commercial real estate projects and the corresponding increase in self-contained accommodation which primarily led to the conversion of such projects.

Aim and Objectives of the study

The aim is to assess the major reasons why there is low demand of the purpose built commercial real estate projects and conversion of same to residential real estate projects (self-contained accommodations).

To achieve the aim stated, the objectives were postulated as follows:

  1. To identify the factors responsible for lack of demand for purpose built commercial real estate projects (complex).
  2. To identify the factors responsible for increase in demand for private real estate projects (self-contained accommodation) in the study area.
  3. To identify the reasons for conversion from commercial to residential real estate projects and as well rank their impacts.

 

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How to cite this paper: Ifediora, C. O. (2020). Change of use: caustic factors, reasons for low demand of purpose built commercial real estate projects and conversion to residential real estate projects in Ajegunle Oyo, Atiba L.G.A., Oyo State; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Ifediora-change-of-use-from-commercial-real-estate-to-residential-projects.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Chrisitan Osita Ifediora

Oyo State, Nigeria

 

 

 

ESV Osita Ifediora, B.Sc.  (Estate Management), M.Sc. Estate Management (Project Management), ANIVS, RSV, is Lecturer in the Department of Estate Management, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Oyo State, Nigeria. Can be contacted on ositaifediora@gmail.com or co.ifediora@acu.edu.ng

 

 

Exploring the common delay factors

related to major parties involved in construction projects: A systematic review

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Adebayo A. Fashina1,2*, Funke F. Fakunle3 and Chibuzo Opiti4

1Project Management Program, School of Graduate Studies and Research, Gollis University, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
2Engineering Management Program and Project Management Program, School of Graduate Studies and Research, Gollis University, Hargeisa, Somaliland.

3Health, Safety, and Environment Department, AdeFolasade Management Systems Consults, Lagos, Nigeria.

4Training Department, Hybrid HSE LTD, Opebi, Ikeja District, Lagos-Nigeria.

*Corresponding author: Adebayo Adeboye Fashina. adebayofashina@gmail.com

 


 

Abstract

Construction projects are mostly considered to be complex and the implementation of such projects are basically risky particularly, when the proper tactics to address this complexity are missing. As such, many construction projects are faced with undesirable outcomes during the implementation phase such as delay in project completion. This is a fundamental challenge that is traceable to the fact that a number of parties are involved in the management of these projects. Consequently, this paper explores the common delay factors related to major parties involved in construction projects. This was achieved via a literature review, by identifying and grouping the delay factors that are common in practice into four categories that include contractor-related factors, consultant-related factors, owner-related factors and other factors. The paper provides significant information for new construction practitioners who may want to start practicing in any construction industry worldwide. Impending researchers are also provided with an improved underlying understanding of the common delay factors related to major parties involved in the construction projects which can help validate their findings in the future.

Keywords:    Common Construction Delay, Roads, Construction Industry, Major Parties Involved in Construction Projects, Low-income Countries

Introduction

Since the creation of the universe, construction have been seen as an essential need for humanity, predominantly, the need for a shelter (Costanza et al., 2007; Shackleton & Shackleton, 2004). The early construction project recorded in human history is the building of a house (Hendrickson & Au, 2008; Pérez-Lombard, Ortiz, & Pout, 2008), and within a short period of time, construction projects improved to a stage where professionals and skilled works are required (Pérez-Lombard et al., 2008). As such, there is a growing demand for construction projects till date, globally. This has led construction industries worldwide to constantly explore significant ways of erecting buildings with high quality, that meets environmental protection requirements, public health and safety requirements, and most recently energy efficiency requirements using trailblazing construction technology and new level of insights/knowledge (Sheikh, Fakunle, & Fashina, 2020).

Consequently, construction stakeholders such as investors, contractors, architects, consultants, materials suppliers are needed in the implementation of these projects. However, the participation of the different parties throughout the lifecycle of the construction projects mostly lead to unwanted challenges (Zou & Zhang, 2009). These challenges affect the productivity, performance and success of construction projects and in turn often leads to the complete abandonment of the entire project(s) by all parties involved (Aibinu & Jagboro, 2002). In fact, these projects are mainly faced with the challenge of delay in completion that affect all aspects of the projects, be it the cost, schedule or the reputation of the parties involved (Aibinu & Jagboro, 2002).

Delay in the construction industry is a global challenge and it is known to be the most common (H. Abdul-Rahman et al., 2006), expensive (Baloi & Price, 2003), risky (Mills, 2001), and a comprehensive problem associated with both private and public construction projects (Li, Akintoye, Edwards, & Hardcastle, 2005). This implies that a delayed project will always have undesirable consequences on the final outcome of such project. Furthermore, like in the telecommunication industries where projects are faced with challenges (Fashina, Abdilahi, & Fakunle, 2020), delays in construction projects downshifts economic activities (Global_Construction, 2015), weaken employment opportunities (Hart, 1973), and can dampen foreign investors (Neary, 2009). These are fundamental challenges in the construction industry that motivated this research.

Thus, the aim of this paper is to present a systematic review on the common delay factors related to major parties involved in construction projects. This paper thus offers useful information that can guide impending research studies related to construction project delays. Moreover, this paper increases the knowledge required to better understand the impacts of stakeholders on project delays in the global construction industry. The first part of this paper presents the background introduction of the link between construction project delays and the impacts of parties involved. The second part explores the major parties involved in construction projects with a focus on the contractors, consultants and owners. In addition, an empirical review on the common delay factors in practice that are related to the major parties involved in construction projects is presented in the third part. The last part of this paper presents the concluding remarks.

 

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How to cite this paper: Fashina, A.A.; Fakunle, F. F.; Opiti, C. (2020). Exploring the common delay factors related to major parties involved in construction projects: A systematic review; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Fashina-Fakunle-Opiti-common-delay-factors-in-construction-projects.pdf

 


 

About the Authors

 


Dr. Adebayo Adeboye Fashina

Hargeisa, Somaliland

 

 

Dr. Adebayo Adeboye Fashina is a young certified management consultant (CMC), professional researcher, educator and education management consultant with over eight years of significant international experience working on STEM education, EOMS/Project management research and teaching, science research and teaching, and capacity building at various levels of education across Africa.

Dr. Adebayo hold a Bachelor’s degree in Physics/Electronics, MSc. in Theoretical Physics and Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Physics. He currently works with Gollis University, Hargeisa as an Associate Professor of Physics and Engineering Management. Prior to his present job, he worked as a Researcher/GTA/Lecturer-B at AUST before joining Kampala International University, Uganda as a Senior Lecturer and later worked as an Associate Professor at William V. S. Tubman University, Liberia. He was nominated for the 2016 Sustainable Energy Africa Awards and shortlisted as one of the three finalists in the ”Emerging Leaders” award category at the 2016 Nigeria Energy Forum.

Dr. Adebayo has conducted training workshops, seminars and given speeches/talks/presentations at local and international conferences. He has published more than 20 articles in reputed journals and is an active reviewer of many international journals. He is a motivated, energetic and focused individual with strengths in innovative teaching approaches, interdisciplinary research, data analysis, teacher training and team management. His research interest includes sustainable living, project management, RE policy and management, education organization management system (EOMS), educational planning, photonic nanostructures of materials etc. He is a fellow of African Scientific Institute, USA and the Institute of Management Consultants, Nigeria.

Dr. Adebayo can be contacted on adebayofashina@gmail.com or afashina@gollisuniversity.org

 


Funke Folasade Fakunle

Lagos Nigeria

 

 

Funke Folasade Fakunle is a young female NEBOSH international diploma qualified professional with 10 years of significant QHSE experience in QHSE management, training and consultancy. Being passionate about Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) and management system in the workplace, she has acquired certifications in Process Safety: Hazard Operability study (HAZOP), Lean six sigma (Green Belt Holder), ISO 9001 Lead Auditor, OHSAS 18001 Lead Auditor, AOFAQ Level 3 Award in Education & Training, NEBOSH International Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health, NEBOSH International General Certificate in Occupational Safety and Health, Project Management, Rigging Safety and Inspection etc.

Funke received a B.Sc. degree in Mathematics from the University of Uyo, Akwa-Ibom, Nigeria in 2008. Over the past 10 years, she has gained significant QHSE experience in various industries.  These include construction, oil & gas, logistics and transportation, telecommunication, manufacturing, banking and security sectors. She is a register Professional/Associated Member of the International Register of Certificated Auditors (IRCA), International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (IIRSM), and Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

As an QHSE Consultant/Trainer at present, she conducts QHSE training, consulting and auditing/evaluation exercises that help improve the QHSE Management Systems of various organizations. This allows her to adequately provide her clients with the necessary advisory services that include but not limited to HSE employee orientation training, development, planning and implementation of QHSE Management Systems, QHSE auditing, Environmental Management System, process improvement and so on.

Funke can be contacted on funkefolasade7@gmail.com

 


Chibuzo Opiti

Lagos Nigeria

 

 

Chibuzo Opiti is a qualified and competent Health & Safety Consultant and Practitioner with vast experience in HSE administration, training and consulting for clients in the Oil and Gas industry as well as in major manufacturing and beverage companies in Nigeria such as NB plc, NBC, Smile communications, SAPETRO, PZ Cussons group, Dangote Group, Seplat amongst others.

He holds a B.Sc. degree in Human Kinetics from the University of Benin with active and consistent work experiences spanning over 9 years that has allowed him to acquire requisite knowledge and skills in safety management systems and loss prevention.

Chibuzo is a certified Auditor to ISO 9001, 14001 and OHSAS 18001 standards. He has also obtained NEBOSH International General Certificate in Health & Safety (UK), NEBOSH Diploma in Environmental Management (UK), amongst several other professional qualification. Over the year he has attended and completed several other professional certificate courses in occupational Health, Safety and Environment within and outside Nigeria.

Chibuzo is currently a Senior Partner and Training Co-Ordinator in Hybrid-HSE limited where he is actively involved in capacity and human capital building in the areas of HSE. As an active HSE practitioner, he has conducted seminars and facilitated various workshops that are geared towards creating more awareness about the HSE fields and mentoring the younger practitioners in the field, to make them not only self-sufficient but also ignite the culture of positive HSE culture in the larger society.

He is currently a member of IOSH, UK, an internationally recognized HSE professional and technical body.

 

 

Major delays in construction projects

A global overview

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Funke F. Fakunle1 and Adebayo A. Fashina2,3*

1Health, Safety, and Environment Department, AdeFolasade Management Systems Consults, Lagos, Nigeria.

2Engineering Management Program and Project Management Program, School of Graduate Studies and Research, Gollis University, Hargeisa, Somaliland.

3Project Management Program, School of Graduate Studies and Research, Gollis University, Hargeisa, Somaliland.

*Corresponding author: Adebayo Adeboye Fashina. adebayofashina@gmail.com

 


 

Abstract

Over the years, delay in construction projects have been a persistent source of concern for construction practitioners, project developers and researchers. This has led the civil engineering and construction research community to develop various approaches and techniques in identifying the major causes of these recurrent eccentricities, globally. The primary objective of this paper is to present an overview of the major delays in construction projects and their causes across the globe with emphasis on the significance research studies conducted in selected countries. The paper is therefore, based on a literature review investigating the major delays in construction projects in selected construction industry globally. The paper could assist impending construction practitioners that may want to enter into the construction market anywhere in the world and upcoming researchers who may want to further explore construction-related projects delay to get an improved fundamental understanding of the major project delays encountered in the construction industry.

Keywords:    Types of construction Delay, Major Construction Delays, Construction Projects

Introduction

Delay can be defined as the extension of timeline required to finish up a construction project (Hammadi & Nawab, 2016). Besides, whenever construction projects encounter delay, they are either lengthened or fast-tracked, which in turn incur extra cost (Subramani, 2014). To the owner, client or donor, delay signifies a loss of revenue via the lack of production facilities and rentable space, a total reliance on current facilities (Oloo & Ngugi, 2016) or inadequacy in the enforcement of building codes and regulations (Fakunle et al., 2020). Sometimes, delay causes excessive overhead costs to the contractor due to a number of reasons that may include prolonged work period, outrageous increase in material costs, and increase in labor cost (Assaf, Bubshait, Atiyah, & Al-Shahri, 2001).

Furthermore, considering the fact that the timely delivery of  any form of  project, be it telecommunication projects (Fashina, Abdilahi, & Fakunle, 2020) or construction projects (Olawale and Sun, 2010) is perceived as one of the most vital aspect of projects success, delay in construction projects can be seen as one of the most common and costly problem encountered in the construction industry and it is globally taken seriously (Abdul-Rahman et al., 2009; Moura et al., 2007; Olawale & Sun, 2010). Presently, many least developed and developing countries in Asia, Middle East, Africa and Europe are faced with the problem of construction delays (Ali, 2018; Alnuaimi & Mohsin, 2013; Kikwasi, 2013; Moura et al., 2007; Sambasivan & Soon, 2007). This implies that construction delays can have several negative effects on construction projects if not properly managed (Sheikh, Fakunle, & Fashina, 2020). Nevertheless, some of these delay effects include time and cost overruns, acceleration losses, low service quality, sudden contract termination, low efficiency, and disputes among key construction stakeholders etc. (Aibinu & Jagboro, 2002; Kikwasi, 2013). Globally, these delays affect the construction industry, without excluding the developed countries such as the US, UK, Australia, China, Japan etc. (Olawale & Sun, 2010; Sepasgozar et al., 2019).

This paper attempts to present an overview of the major delays in construction projects from a global perspective. In an effort to achieve this, a detailed literature review investigating the major delays in construction projects and their causes in selected construction industry across the globe was carried out. Moreover, this paper expands and provides an improved understanding of project delays in the global construction industry. This however, offers useful information that can guide future studies related to delay in construction projects.

 

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How to cite this paper: Fakunle, F. F., Fashina, A. A. (2020). Major delays in construction projects: A global overview; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Fakunle-Fashina-major-delays-in-construction-projects.pdf

 


 

About the Authors

 


Funke Folasade Fakunle

Lagos Nigeria

 

 

 

Funke Folasade Fakunle is a young female NEBOSH international diploma qualified professional with 10 years of significant QHSE experience in QHSE management, training and consultancy. Being passionate about Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) and management system in the workplace, she has acquired certifications in Process Safety: Hazard Operability study (HAZOP), Lean six sigma (Green Belt Holder), ISO 9001 Lead Auditor, OHSAS 18001 Lead Auditor, AOFAQ Level 3 Award in Education & Training, NEBOSH International Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health, NEBOSH International General Certificate in Occupational Safety and Health, Project Management, Rigging Safety and Inspection etc.

Funke received a B.Sc. degree in Mathematics from the University of Uyo, Akwa-Ibom, Nigeria in 2008. Over the past 10 years, she has gained significant QHSE experience in various industries.  These include construction, oil & gas, logistics and transportation, telecommunication, manufacturing, banking and security sectors. She is a register Professional/Associated Member of the International Register of Certificated Auditors (IRCA), International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (IIRSM), and Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

As an QHSE Consultant/Trainer at present, she conducts QHSE training, consulting and auditing/evaluation exercises that help improve the QHSE Management Systems of various organizations. This allows her to adequately provide her clients with the necessary advisory services that include but not limited to HSE employee orientation training, development, planning and implementation of QHSE Management Systems, QHSE auditing, Environmental Management System, process improvement and so on.

Funke can be contacted on funkefolasade7@gmail.com

 

 


Dr. Adebayo Adeboye Fashina

Hargeisa, Somaliland

 

 

 

Dr. Adebayo Adeboye Fashina is a young certified management consultant (CMC), professional researcher, educator and education management consultant with over eight years of significant international experience working on STEM education, EOMS/Project management research and teaching, science research and teaching, and capacity building at various levels of education across Africa.

Dr. Adebayo hold a Bachelor’s degree in Physics/Electronics, MSc. in Theoretical Physics and Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Physics. He currently works with Gollis University, Hargeisa as an Associate Professor of Physics and Engineering Management. Prior to his present job, he worked as a Researcher/GTA/Lecturer-B at AUST before joining Kampala International University, Uganda as a Senior Lecturer and later worked as an Associate Professor at William V. S. Tubman University, Liberia. He was nominated for the 2016 Sustainable Energy Africa Awards and shortlisted as one of the three finalists in the ”Emerging Leaders” award category at the 2016 Nigeria Energy Forum.

Dr. Adebayo has conducted training workshops, seminars and given speeches/talks/presentations at local and international conferences. He has published more than 20 articles in reputed journals and is an active reviewer of many international journals. He is a motivated, energetic and focused individual with strengths in innovative teaching approaches, interdisciplinary research, data analysis, teacher training and team management. His research interest includes sustainable living, project management, RE policy and management, education organization management system (EOMS), educational planning, photonic nanostructures of materials etc. He is a fellow of African Scientific Institute, USA and the Institute of Management Consultants, Nigeria.

Dr. Adebayo can be contacted on adebayofashina@gmail.com or afashina@gollisuniversity.org

 

 

Quantitative Models of Emergence

in Light of Mathematical Theory of Human Systems

Part 3:  Probabilistic Mathematical Models of New Quality Emergence

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Pavel Barseghyan, PhD

Texas and Armenia

 


 

Abstract

The first two parts of the article were devoted to linear and nonlinear mathematical models of emergense, which describe the generation of human activity results and new qualities at the level of averages of their parameters.

Within the framework of such deterministic approach, many phenomena related to human activity can be described, interpreted and predicted, but these approaches encounter serious difficulties when it is necessary to take into account the various kinds of random events that accompany human activity.

The difficulties associated with such random factors are much greater when performing activities at the upper limits of human abilities.

On the other hand, it is at the upper limits of human abilities and human systems capabilities that the most important events and emergencies related to human progress and safety take place.

An adequate quantitative description of such phenomena is possible only within the framework of probabilistic approaches, which will be discussed in the third part of the article, which includes mathematical models of the emergence at the level of probability distributions of the characteristic parameters of human activity.

Introduction

Although non-linear models of emergence have wide opportunities to adequately reflect different aspects of this important phenomenon, there is one area where they as deterministic models are not capable of describing randomness as an integral part of human activity.

The thing is that the emergence itself is a highly random phenomenon, especially in the areas where it is really about creating, giving birth, and emerging new phenomena and processes.

Emergence deterministic models describe the phenomena and processes in question at the mean level of the parameters, which does not allow them to form an understanding of the likelihood or risk of successful completion of human activities.

The need for probabilistic approaches in this area is due to the fact that some parameters in the equations of state for describing the emergence phenomenon are of a pronounced random character.

To illustrate the essence of the question more precisely, consider the following simplest equation of state of person’s activity [1, 2]

 

This equation describes the realization by a person of an activity of magnitude  with motivation  over a period of time  .

The value  in equation (1) is the number of successfully performed actions by a person per unit time, and the value  is the degree of difficulty of the actions performed.

Given that one of the main causes of failures in human activity is a delay in the performance of their actions, which gradually accumulates in order to exceed the time allotted for activities, let’s consider the use of equation (1) to analyze the duration of an individual’s activity:

In principle, all four parameters contained in this expression can be random values, so that the duration  of activity will also be random.

Depending on many circumstances, these four random variables may have different distribution functions: symmetric, asymmetric, with a heavy tail, etc.

This means that the distribution of activity duration  will be directly determined by the distributions of these four quantities, which in simple linear cases can be symmetric and have a small dispersion, and in complex nonlinear cases it can be asymmetric and have a large dispersion, and in more complex cases – heavy tail.

Given these circumstances, a methodology based on hypothetical asymmetric triangular or other distributions of  values, which are often used for simulation in the field of project management, needs serious adjustments.

 

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How to cite this paper: Barseghyan, P. (2020). Quantitative Models of Emergence in Light of Mathematical Theory of Human Systems – Part 3:  Probabilistic Mathematical Models of New Quality Emergence; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Barseghyan-Emergence-Part3-probabalistic-mathematical-models.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Pavel Barseghyan, PhD

Yerevan, Armenia
Plano, Texas, USA

 

Dr. Pavel Barseghyan is a consultant in the field of quantitative project management, project data mining and organizational science. Has over 45 years’ experience in academia, the electronics industry, the EDA industry and Project Management Research and tools development. During the period of 1999-2010 he was the Vice President of Research for Numetrics Management Systems. Prior to joining Numetrics, Dr. Barseghyan worked as an R&D manager at Infinite Technology Corp. in Texas. He was also a founder and the president of an EDA start-up company, DAN Technologies, Ltd. that focused on high-level chip design planning and RTL structural floor planning technologies. Before joining ITC, Dr. Barseghyan was head of the Electronic Design and CAD department at the State Engineering University of Armenia, focusing on development of the Theory of Massively Interconnected Systems and its applications to electronic design. During the period of 1975-1990, he was also a member of the University Educational Policy Commission for Electronic Design and CAD Direction in the Higher Education Ministry of the former USSR. Earlier in his career he was a senior researcher in Yerevan Research and Development Institute of Mathematical Machines (Armenia). He is an author of nine monographs and textbooks and more than 100 scientific articles in the area of quantitative project management, mathematical theory of human work, electronic design and EDA methodologies, and tools development. More than 10 Ph.D. degrees have been awarded under his supervision. Dr. Barseghyan holds an MS in Electrical Engineering (1967) and Ph.D. (1972) and Doctor of Technical Sciences (1990) in Computer Engineering from Yerevan Polytechnic Institute (Armenia).

Pavel’s publications can be found here: http://www.scribd.com/pbarseghyan and here: http://pavelbarseghyan.wordpress.com/.  Pavel can be contacted at terbpl@gmail.com

 

 

Trends of Real Estate Investment Performance

in South-East Nigeria

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Kalu Nwojo Awa, Dr. F. O. Nwanekezie, Dr. Paul Chuks Anih

Department of Estate Management
University of Uyo

Uyo, Nigeria

 


 

ABSTRACT

The study was carried out to analyse the trend of residential and commercial real estate investments performances in South East, Nigeria with the view to generate forecasting model for future rents and capital values of different classes of properties in the study area. Survey method was used in carrying out the study. Questionnaire were drawn to collect the annual rents and capital values data; regression analysis model was used to determine the trend characteristics of the property rents, capital values and returns as well as to generate the forecasting model. The results showed that the rents and the capital values of the properties increassed significantly with time having P-values <0.05. Properties in Abakaliki on average recorded the highest annual rent growth rate, followed by Aba (10-20% and 10-13.2% respectively); while Owerri recorded the highest average annual capital value growth rate seconded by Aba (6.9 – 10% and 6.2 – 10.6% respectively).

Keywords:     Rental values, capital values, trend analysis, Forecasting, residential and commercial properties.

INTRODUCTION

Globally, real estate investments have over the years been adjudged to offer steady growth in value, hence real estate has been considered to possess the characteristic of hedging against inflation.  To the investors, real estate offers dual opportunities of value enhancement vis-à-vis rental income and capital value appreciation. The trends of real estate investment performance are factored by demands and supplies levels. Where demands exceed supplies, definitely the rents and prices would soar creating steady increase in returns.

Despite the speculations that real estate rents and capital values are bound to increase with time, it is expedient that real estate investors should be amply informed of the performance history of the various classes of real estate for proper guidance in investment selections that would guarantee investment optimal returns. Observations over the years have shown that most investors naively invest in a particular real estate class and city of their choices without recourse to the historical antecedents of the property market of the cities and the performances of different classes of real estate. These have often led to sub-optimal investment performance particularly when the supplies are not properly matched with the demands.

Therefore, the study was carried out to analyse the performances of residential and commercial real estate investments in South East, Nigeria and to generate a model that would be used in predicting future rents and capital values of residential and commercial real estate in the study area which would guide the investors in their choices of real estate investment and location.

GENERAL AND SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

The study was carried out to analyse the performances of real estate investment in South East, Nigeria; with the view to determine their rental and capital values trend. The specific objectives set out for the study include to:

  • examine the trends of residential and commercial real estate investment returns in South East States of Nigeria (2008 -2017)
  • generate the forecasting model for the real estate investment rents and capital values and
  • determine the mean annual growth rate of the rents and capital values of the different classes of properties in the study area.

 

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How to cite this paper: Awa, K. N., Nwanekezie, F. O., Anih, P. C. (2020). Trends of Real Estate Investment Performance in South-East Nigeria; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/pmwj93-May2020-Awa-Nwanekezie-Chuks-real-estate-investment-performance-in-southeast-nigeria.pdf

 

 


 

About the Authors

 


Kalu N. Awa

Uyo, Nigeria

 

 

Kalu N. Awa is a Lecturer in the Department of Estate Management, University of Uyo, Nigeria. He is presently running a PhD programme in Estate Management at Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria. He is an Associate of The Nigerian Institution of Estate Surveyors and Valuers (NIESV) and a registered member of the Estate Surveyors and Valuers Registration Board of Nigeria (ESVARBON). Kalu N. Awa can be contacted at kalunwojo4@gmail.com

 


Dr. F. O. Nwanekezie 

Uyo, Nigeria

 

 

Dr. F. O. Nwanekezie is an Associate Professor in the Department of Estate Management, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. He is an associate of the Nigerian Institution of Estate Surveyors and Valuers and a registered member of the Estate Surveyors and Valuers Registration Board of Nigeria (ESVARBON). Dr. Nwanekezie can be contacted at okeynwanekezie@yahoo.com

 


Dr. Paul Chuks Anih

Uyo, Nigeria

 

 

Dr. Paul Chuks Anih is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Estate Management, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. He is an associate of the Nigerian Institution of Estate Surveyors and Valuers and currently the Head, Department of Estate Management, University of Uyo. Dr. Paul C Anih can be contacted at paulanih@uniuyo.edu.ng

 

Analysis, comparison and evaluation

of different approaches and practices adopted in order to identify and mitigate most common project risks

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Giuseppe Arcidiacono, PMP, CGEIT, CISM, CISA, CRISC,

ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditor

Calabria, Italy

 


 

ABSTRACT

This paper aims to collect, analyse and study the best practices adopted in order to identify and mitigate most common project risks by comparing some of the most interesting articles retrieved in the current literature around the world.

The analysis aims to help practitioners to acquire more awareness about project risk management that unfortunately remains an undeveloped discipline while it should become a key activity in every project and should be integrated during all phases of project management, from starting to the very end.

For every source, the present document report in a table the risks identified by the original researcher together with descriptions and mitigation actions proposed in his/her work.

INTRODUCTION

According to the PMBOK Guide, sixth edition, the objectives of project risk management are to increase the probability and/or impact of positive risks and to decrease the probability and/or impact of negative risks, in order to optimize the chances of project success.

PMI also states in the “Practice standard for Project Risk Management” that Project Risk Management is a valuable component of project management and it enhances the value of the other project management processes.

Project Risk Management should be conducted in a manner consistent with existing organizational practices and policies, in a way that is appropriate to the project, and should recognize the business challenges as well as the multi-cultural environment associated with an increasingly global environment including many joint venture projects and customers, suppliers, and workforces spread around the globe.

Identifying and properly addressing risks has become, for several reasons, a troubled process in modern Project Management and many risks recur often in many projects; for this reason many scientific articles, papers and books have analysed and studied the most common risks occurring during project’s life cycle with the goal to give to project manager proper tools and workarounds.

The present paper aim to compare different approaches to project risk and different lists of project risks created by several authors with the objective to give a holistic vision of the most important and common risks actually faced around the world.

The 7 Common Project Management Risks reported by JetRuby Agency

JetRuby Agency gives an interesting picture of project management risks in the web article https://expertise.jetruby.com/7-common-project-management-risks-and-how-to-avoid-them-2395f3af9cab, in which the authors have gathered and commented some of the most common project management risks that may occur during project implementation and how to avoid them.

In the following table, risks and descriptions are reported along with JetRuby’s general considerations about project risk management.

 

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How to cite this paper: Arcidiacono, G. (2020). Analysis, comparison and evaluation of different approaches and practices adopted in order to identify and mitigate most common project risks; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Arcidiacono-analysis-of-most-common-risk-management-practices.pdf

 


 

About the Author

 


Giuseppe Arcidiacono

Calabria, Italy

 

 

Giuseppe Arcidiacono, PMP, CISM, CISA, CGEIT, CRISC, ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditor is an Italian Computer Engineer, member of ISACA.

Graduated with honours from the University of Calabria, Giuseppe holds two post-graduate master’s degrees in “Public Management” and in “Governance, Audit and Control System for Public and Private Organizations”.

He holds the following international certifications:

  • PMP – Project Management Professional – PMI (Project Management Institute);
  • CISA – Certified Information System Auditor – ISACA;
  • CISM – Certified Information Security Manager – ISACA;
  • CGEIT – Ceritified in Governance of Enterprise IT;
  • CRISC – Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control.
  • ISO/IEC 27001 Lead Auditor

Giuseppe has working in Project Management since 2003 and is specialized in the European Commission Project Management Framework based on PCM (Project Cycle Management).

Giuseppe is author of several scientific articles about Governance of IT (GEIT), Information Security Management and Audit, and Project Management published in prestigious international Journals and Blogs.

Since 2008 Giuseppe is the Head of IT Department in ARCEA, Agenzia della Regione Calabria per le Erogazioni in Agricoltura (http://www.arcea.it), an European Commission Accredited Paying Agency (pursuant to Reg (UE) 907/2014).

He has worked as IT Auditor, IT Risk Practioner and CEO – consultant for many Italian enterprises. Previously, Giuseppe worked as IT Project Manager in several international IT projects.

Giuseppe can be contacted at: arcidiaconog@gmail.com

 

 

Exploring the extent to which project scope management processes

influence the implementation of telecommunication projects

 

FEATURED PAPER

By Sakariye Mahamed Abdilahi1, Funke Folasade Fakunle2, Adebayo Adeboye Fashina1,3*

1Project Management Program, School of Graduate Studies and Research, Gollis University, 26 June District, Hargeisa, Somaliland.

2Compliance and Auditing Department, AdeFolasade Management Systems Consults, Lagos-Nigeria.

3Engineering Management Program, School of Graduate Studies and Research, Gollis University, 26 June District, Hargeisa, Somaliland.

*Corresponding author: Adebayo Adeboye Fashina. adebayofashina@gmail.com

 


 

Abstract

This paper attempts to fill a significant knowledge gap by exploring the extent to which project scope management processes influence the implementation of telecommunication projects in Somaliland. Using a questionnaire survey design with the six aspects of project scope management, data were acquired from 59 stakeholders chosen based on simple random sampling from the Somaliland telecommunication industry. SPSS Statistics Software and Microsoft Excel Packages was then used to analyze the collected data. This was achieved by computing the Cronbach’s Alpha, mean values and Relative Importance Index (RII), respectively, for reliability check and ranking purposes. The results from the analysis indicate that project scope control (RII = 0.672), project scope validation (RII = 0.660) and project scope verification (RII = 0.636) are the three most preferred project scope management processes, in terms of their level of significance to the implementation of telecommunication projects, respectively. The implications of the results obtained in this study are quite essential to impending telecommunication projects as they provide new insights that could guide the development of strategies required for future implementation of project scope management in the telecommunication industry. Consequently, telecommunication companies are recommended to mandate scope management practices when implementing future telecommunication projects with the task to continuously organize project management training activities for their staffs.

Keywords:    Project Management, Project Scope Management Processes, Application of Scope Management, Telecommunication Projects, Low-income Countries, Somaliland

Introduction

With a huge competitiveness in the global telecommunication industry in recent years, telecommunication companies are now faced with the task of effectively implementing telecommunication projects based on a definite project scope that can help achieve the complete projects objectives (Fashina, Abdilahi, & Fakunle, 2020; Khan, 2006). Consequently, the failure or success of projects such as building and construction projects (Fakunle, Opiti, Sheikh, & Fashina, 2020), telecommunication projects (Fashina et al., 2020) depends on how effective the project scope is managed. This is one of the reasons why scope management ensures that a project’s scope is correctly defined and mapped, which in turn allows the project managers to properly allocate the required labor and costs needed to complete any project (Nath & Momin, 2014).

More importantly, project scope management focuses on planning and controlling (Dumont, Gibson, & Fish, 1997) and that is why the management of clients’ or stakeholders’ expectations can be quite taskings for a project manager (Fashina, Fakunle, & Opiti, 2020). Essentially, a discrete scope helps stakeholders involved in a project to stay on the same page all through the project’s lifespan (Sheikh, Fakunle, & Fashina, 2020). So, when a project scope is clearly defined, effectively managed and communicated to the stakeholders involved in the project, it can safeguard such projects from potential issues or challenges (Fashina et al., 2020; Ogunberu, Olaposi, & Akintelu, 2016). Project scope can therefore help differentiate between what is and what is not involved in a project and controls what is to be allowed or removed as it is implemented (Bingham & Gibson, 2017; Cho & Gibson, 2001; Dumont et al., 1997). Scope management also generates control factors, that can be applied when tackling issues that are the consequences of changes during the different phases of the project. One can thus argue that project scope is critical, and without it, project managers would have no clue of timeline, cost or labor involved in a project (Fakunle & Fashina, 2020). This implies that scope management serves as the foundation for the decision-making of a project manager during the course of any project (Bingham & Gibson, 2017; Cho & Gibson, 2001; Dumont et al., 1997).

Furthermore, project scope management is basically used to support the management of projects to succeed. This includes ICT and telecommunication projects that are introduced by telecommunication companies (Beldi, Cheffi, & Dey, 2010; Kapsali, 2011). Prior studies also confirmed that the core aspects of project scope management used by telecommunication sector include project scope plan, scope control, scope verification and work breakdown structure, respectively (Ogunberu et al., 2016; Ogunberu, Olufemi, & Olaposi, 2018). Studies by (Eckerson, 2011; Ogunberu et al., 2018) have also shown that the implementation of project scope management to manage projects like IT projects normally goes a long way to improve the project delivery success.

In spite of this fundamental understanding of scope management and the increasing implementation and development of ICT and telecommunication projects in low-income countries (Fashina et al., 2020; Ogunberu et al., 2018), a huge number of these projects have experienced huge failure rates, possibly, due to poor project scope, design and management (Fashina et al., 2020; Gutierrez & Berg, 2000). This is why the telecommunication industry and their project management teams are examining procedures and processes involved in managing projects in an effort to increase the project success rates (Gutierrez & Berg, 2000). Within this context, the telecommunication companies in low-income countries need to give extra attention to project scope management practice in order to safeguard return on investment and sustain market share. There is therefore a need to explore the extent to which project scope management processes influence the implementation of telecommunication projects in Somaliland.

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How to cite this paper: Abdilahi, S. M.; Fakunle, F. F.; Fashina, A. A. (2020). Exploring the extent to which project scope management processes influence the implementation of telecommunication projects; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue V, May.   Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/pmwj93-May2020-Abdilahi-Fakunle-Fashina-telecommunications-project-scope-management.pdf

 


 

About the Authors

 


Sakariye Mahamed Abdilahi

Hargeisa, Somaliland

 

 

 

Sakariye Mahamed Abdillahi is a member of Dr. Adebayo’s research group at Gollis University and an Assistant Lecturer in the department of telecommunication engineering at same University. Sakariye hold a B.Sc. degree in Telecommunication Engineering and Master of Arts in Project Management from Gollis University, Hargeisa, Somaliland. He is proficient in communication, training, organization, the use of social media outlets, and the use of Microsoft Office packages such as MS Word, MS Excel, and MS Power point.

His research interests evolve around the application of project management knowledge areas to telecommunication projects, project and engineering management, application of project management knowledge areas to small and medium enterprises (SMEs) etc.

Sakariye can be contacted on zakariemoe@gmail.com

 


Funke Folasade Fakunle

Lagos Nigeria

 

 

Funke Folasade Fakunle is a young female NEBOSH international diploma qualified professional with 10 years of significant QHSE experience in QHSE management, training and consultancy. Being passionate about Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) and management system in the workplace, she has acquired certifications in Process Safety: Hazard Operability study (HAZOP), Lean six sigma (Green Belt Holder), ISO 9001 Lead Auditor, OHSAS 18001 Lead Auditor, AOFAQ Level 3 Award in Education & Training, NEBOSH International Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health, NEBOSH International General Certificate in Occupational Safety and Health, Project Management, Rigging Safety and Inspection etc.

Funke received a B.Sc. degree in Mathematics from the University of Uyo, Akwa-Ibom, Nigeria in 2008. Over the past 10 years, she has gained significant QHSE experience in various industries.  These include construction, oil & gas, logistics and transportation, telecommunication, manufacturing, banking and security sectors. She is a register Professional/Associated Member of the International Register of Certificated Auditors (IRCA), International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (IIRSM), and Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

As an QHSE Consultant/Trainer at present, she conducts QHSE training, consulting and auditing/evaluation exercises that help improve the QHSE Management Systems of various organizations. This allows her to adequately provide her clients with the necessary advisory services that include but not limited to HSE employee orientation training, development, planning and implementation of QHSE Management Systems, QHSE auditing, Environmental Management System, process improvement and so on.

Funke can be contacted on funkefolasade7@gmail.com

 


Dr. Adebayo Adeboye Fashina

Hargeisa, Somaliland

 

 

 

Dr. Adebayo Adeboye Fashina is a young certified management consultant (CMC), professional researcher, educator and education management consultant with over eight years of significant international experience working on STEM education, EOMS/Project management research and teaching, science research and teaching, and capacity building at various levels of education across Africa.

Dr. Adebayo hold a Bachelor’s degree in Physics/Electronics, MSc. in Theoretical Physics and Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Physics. He currently works with Gollis University, Hargeisa as an Associate Professor of Physics and Engineering Management. Prior to his present job, he worked as a Researcher/GTA/Lecturer-B at AUST before joining Kampala International University, Uganda as a Senior Lecturer and later worked as an Associate Professor at William V. S. Tubman University, Liberia. He was nominated for the 2016 Sustainable Energy Africa Awards and shortlisted as one of the three finalists in the ”Emerging Leaders” award category at the 2016 Nigeria Energy Forum.

Dr. Adebayo has conducted training workshops, seminars and given speeches/talks/presentations at local and international conferences. He has published more than 20 articles in reputed journals and is an active reviewer of many international journals. He is a motivated, energetic and focused individual with strengths in innovative teaching approaches, interdisciplinary research, data analysis, teacher training and team management. His research interest includes sustainable living, project management, RE policy and management, education organization management system (EOMS), educational planning, photonic nanostructures of materials etc. He is a fellow of African Scientific Institute, USA and the Institute of Management Consultants, Nigeria.

Dr. Adebayo can be contacted on adebayofashina@gmail.com  or afashina@gollisuniversity.org

 

 

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