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August 2019 PM Update from Spain

 

PMI Madrid Chapter, Agile Initiative

 

REPORT

By Alfonso Bucero

International Correspondent

Madrid, Spain

 


 

 

The PMI Madrid Spain Chapter continues with its AGILE Initiative in Spain

Joaquín Azcarraga Urteaga
PMP, PMI-ACP, Agile Project Manager

We have had the opportunity to get the review comments from an AGILE practitioner and member of the PMI Madrid Chapter about the PMI Agile Guide. Thanks to Joaquin’s review.

As it was explained by PMI, says Joaquín Azcárraga, this guide is especially aimed to project managers familiar working on “traditional predictive or cascade” environments – in such a way that it can be adapted to more agile environments. This is very well reflected in the contents that specifically focuses on issues of cultural shift and hybrid approaches.

As a difference among other PMI standards, the style is more informal and has pictures aside with examples, tips, etc… something that is welcome since it makes its reading a lighter task. As well, the guide is divided into four sections:

  • An introduction to Agile,
  • Life cycle (from predictive “pure” to “pure” agile),
  • implementation and,
  • Organizational considerations (although the management of organizational change is outside of the scope of the Guide, concerning PMI expressed in change management in the organizations-guide practice).

More…

To read entire report, click here for (English) or (Spanish)

 

How to cite this report:  Bucero, A. (2019). August 2019 Project Management Update from Spain, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August. Available online at: https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Bucero-Regional-Report-Spain-ENGLISH.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Alfonso Bucero

Madrid, Spain

 

 

 

Alfonso Bucero, MSc, CPS, PMP, PMI-RMP, PfMP, PMI Fellow, is an International Correspondent and Contributing Editor for the PM World Journal in Madrid, Spain. Mr. Bucero is also founder and Managing Partner of BUCERO PM Consulting.  Alfonso was the founder, sponsor and president of the PMI Barcelona Chapter until April 2005, and belongs to PMI’s LIAG (Leadership Institute Advisory Group).  He was the past President of the PMI Madrid Spain Chapter, and then nominated as a PMI EMEA Region 8 Component Mentor. Now he is a member of the PMIEF Engagement Committee. Alfonso has a Computer Science Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica in Madrid and is studying for his Ph.D. in Project Management. He has 32 years of practical experience and is actively engaged in advancing the PM profession in Spain and throughout Europe. He received the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award on October 9th, 2010, the PMI Fellow Award on October 22nd 2011 and the PMI Eric Jenett Excellence Award on October 28th, 2017.

Mr. Bucero can be contacted at alfonso.bucero@abucero.com.

To see other works by Alfonso Bucero, visit his author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/alfonso-bucero/

 

 

Report from EURAM

A brief overview of the Euram conference in Lisbon in June 2019

 

REPORT

By Prof Helgi Thor Ingason, PhD

Reykjavik University

Reykjavik, Iceland

 


 

Euram or European Academy of Management is one of the larger academic conferences in the field of management. This annual conference typically attracts about 1000 people from across the globe, but it is usually held in Europe. In June 2019 the Euram conference was held in Lisbon, Portugal. A record number of participants attended the conference or 1800 people, and more than 1200 studies were presented, within different fields of business and management. The conference venue was ISCTE – Instituto Universitário de Lisbon (ISCTE-IUL).

It is of course impossible to explain the vast number of research papers presented at this conference in a short article, but one of its many streams is dedicated to project organising. As a consequence, many of the word leading scholars came to Lisbon for the conference, much-admired researchers from universities in North America, Australia, Africa, Asia and Europe.

The editors of four important academic journals in project management presented their journals. These were Martina Huemann, editor of the International Journal of Project Management (IJPM), Ralf Müller, editor of the Project management Journal (PMJ), Natalie Drouin, editor of the International Journal of Managing Projects in Business (IJMPB) and Young Hoon Kwak editor of Journal of Management in Engineering (JME). All of these journals have a different focus, and the editors briefly outlined the aims and scope of their journals and how their impact has grown.

A total of 80 lectures on project management were given, divided into a number of themes. Action research was discussed, a useful research method within project management. The management of portfolios was discussed, and the development of new knowledge for that purpose.

 

More…

To read entire report, click here

 

How to cite this report: Ingason, H.T. (2019). A brief overview of the Euram conference in Lisbon in June 2019, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at: https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Ingason-report-from-euram-2019-conference-in-lisbon.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Helgi Thor Ingason, PhD

Professor, Reykjavik University
Reykjavik, Iceland

 

 

 

Helgi Thor Ingason (b. 1965) holds a PhD in process metallurgy from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), MSc in mechanical and industrial engineering from the University of Iceland and a Stanford Advanced Project Management Certification from Stanford University. He is an IPMA Certified Senior Project Manager (B level).

Dr. Ingason is a professor at Reykjavik University. He is co-head (with Dr. Haukur Ingi Jonasson) of the MPM – Master of Project Management – program at the university. The research fields of Dr. Ingason range from quality- and project management to system dynamics and renewable energy, production, transport and utilization, changes in the energy infrastructure and energy carriers of the future.

Dr. Ingason has reported on his research at conferences and in several reviewed conference and journal papers. He is the co-author of 7 books in the Icelandic language on project management, strategic planning, product development and quality management. He is also co-author, with Haukur Ingi Jonasson, of the books Project Ethics (2013), Project: Leadership (2018), Project: Strategy (2018), Project: Communication (2019) and Project: Execution (2019). To learn more about these books, visit the Routledge publishing site here.

Dr. Ingason was interim CEO of Orkuveita Reykjavikur (Reykjavik Energy) from 2010 to 2011. A co-founder of Nordica Consulting Group, Dr. Ingason is a management consultant and a recognized speaker. In his spare time he plays piano and accordion with the South River Band (www.southriverband.com), and Kólga (www.kolga.band), two Icelandic world music ensembles.

More information on Dr. Ingason can be found on www.academia.edu and on www.helgithoringason.com. Information about the MPM program at the University of Reykjavik can be found at http://en.ru.is/mpm/why-mpm/.  Dr. Ingason can be contacted at helgithor@ru.is.

 

 

The contractual strategy of performance managers

to avoid losses of a cancelled concert and perpetrate the event

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Tom Perrigaud

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 


 

ABSTRACT

This paper was written as part of The International Project contract class conducted by Dr Paul Giammalvo within the Msc Project and Program management and business development in SKEMA Business school.

This paper will enable performance managers to manage successfully a project and more precisely a concert. Since the sequence and multitude of international concerts called “Tour”, these are sources of income but can also cause huge losses in the event of cancellation by an artist for various reasons.

Therefore, this paper will highlight the feasible alternatives that can be used to enable performance managers to avoid cancellation and manage it properly.

Thanks to a deep study using non-compensatory and multi-attribute decision-making models and the additive weighting technique we will be able to choose the best option to avoid cost and time-consuming losses. Among those feasible alternatives, we have: Setting a plan B (keeping initial artist or replacing it), Insurance bond (postponing cost or cancelling compensation), total compensation clause and artist specific contract.

This paper recommends the performance managers to use total compensation clause because it discourages artists ‘wrongdoings and prevent from any losses. If possible this article advises performance managers to complete the contract with a plan B clause and an artist-specific contract.

Keywords:  concert artist contract; legislation and regulation of the performing arts; concert cancellation; postponed concert; claim for compensation

INTRODUCTION

To participate in a concert, “you must pay in average 84,63 Us dollars to hear an artist”[1]. But sometimes, the artist does not show up, which causes irritation and frustration from the public.  Overall, “concert organization is a big commitment in time and resources”[2]. Indeed, making live artistic performance contracts is complicated; to draw up and negotiate requires a lot of time and tremendous costs for the concert manager.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Perrigaud, T. (2019). The contractual strategy of performance managers to avoid losses of a cancelled concert and perpetrate the event, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Perrgaud-contractual-strategy-to-avoid-losses-of-cancelled-concert.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Tom Perrigaud

Lille, France

                            

 

 

Tom Perrigaud is a PGE master 2 student in skema Business school currently in Msc Project and Program Management and Business Development in Lille France. Born in France, he has a strong international background spending the rest of his high school education in Germany where his parents live and made his preparatory class during 2 years in Vienna in Austria where he developed a real taste for languages and international cultures.

In 2016 he entered in Skema Business school where he did a License in Management. He spent his master 1 in United States where he developed his skills in negotiation, strategy and innovation. He will be starting an internship in January 2019 in AFD TECH as a business developer. He has experienced in event planning and business development while he was president and vice-president of two cultural and musicals associations during in Skema Business School. He is certified Prince2 and AgilePM recently.

Tom lives in Lille, France and can be contacted at tom.perrigaud@skema.edu or tom.perrigaud@hotmail.fr

You can also send him a message via his linkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/tom-perrigaud

 

[1] Global average music tour ticket price 2017 | Statistic. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.statista.com/statistics/380106/global-average-music-tour-ticket-price/

[2] The Purdue University, The Purdue concert guide (23,july,2015 )- https://www.purdue.edu/sao/documents/purdue-concert-guide.pdf

 

 

How can companies comply with 2018 GDPR

regulation while earning benefits?

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Etienne Plassard

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France

 


 

ABSTRACT

As a reaction to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) implemented on May 25th of 2018, companies seek compliance and better data privacy management. Besides, lots of them are still struggling with processes implementation. This paper aims at offering concrete solutions to start and improve their overall GDPR compliance while earning benefits and saving costs. This study will answer the following research questions: how to deal with data-privacy contract management, how to manage data efficiently, and how to mitigate risks related to data breaches. The research method used to evaluate the different solutions is the additive weighting technique based on a compensation model. We will find that the four best alternatives must be combined to ensure significant GDPR compliancy and benefits. Thus, adopting a performant contract management system and having a strong breach identification is necessary, as well as using the Agile methodology to implement change.

Keywords:     Cash Flows, Data, Protection, GDPR, Compliance, Risk Mitigation, Storage, Breaches, Cybersecurity, CMS, Anonymization

INTRODUCTION

Do you think it is normal that today, only one in five companies surveyed believe they are GDPR compliant?  This famous agreement on data protection implemented since May 25th of 2018 reveals not to be respected by a wide majority of US and European companies.[1]

The problem is complex for many reasons: “GDPR’s scope is far more comprehensive and wide-reaching, meaning businesses will need to amend their data protection policies accordingly”, says a Virtual College study.[2] There are way more clauses to comply with than the previous 1995 DPA and the volume of data concerned is tremendous for big corporations. It represents also a deep shift in people ways of working, as well as huge IT organizational and process changes. In parallel, data privacy stakes are rising: the Ponemone Institute found increasing data breaches in frequency (33% in 2013 and 43% in 2014)[3] while Verizon confirmed 53,000 incidents and 2,216 confirmed data breaches in 2018[4]. On top of that, the legal part remains the major concern of GDPR, however, it is also a question of freedom, respect, and dignity of the people[5].

One can realize all these major changes cannot be implemented once and for all, even more on a short-time period. In this study, we will develop actions and processes companies can use to tend to full GDPR compliancy while earning benefits at the same time. It is something very progressive companies must work on because it targets not only data management but also change and risk management. On top of that, this very wide project must be seen as a long-term process to put in parallel with a global better data privacy management. According to Daniel Mintz, “All businesses housing large volumes of data are faced with a dilemma: figuring out which data to keep and ensuring that data that is kept is secure”.[6] Indeed, these structures are at the edge of transformation and integration solutions that help their clients managing their databases. We will narrow the study to EU and US companies that can afford the solutions furtherly approached, starting from medium-sized companies up to corporations.

In this study, we will enlighten three major issues companies must face and their related solutions. First, data-related contract management becomes a nightmare when it comes to checking on every clause. Identifying the data nature and stakeholders concerned is the first step to a long process, not to mention US and EU differences and opening clauses that “permit a Member State to modify the provisions of the Article” for a “more restrictive application of the GDPR obligation via local legislation.”[7] In parallel, companies must tackle data issues such as increasing data volume and relevancy. For example, “you may need to appoint a data protection officer (DPO), depending on the types of processing your company conducts”[8], to tackle daily and long-term data privacy purposes. Launching data minimization and anonymization processes should reduce sensitive data ownership because according to Recital 26 of GDPR, “The principles of data protection should therefore not apply to anonymous information, namely information which does not relate to an identified or identifiable natural person or to personal data rendered anonymous in such a manner that the data subject is not or no longer identifiable”[9]. Thus, the ability to use this kind of data can help companies improve their customers’ experience, or simply be a new source of profit.[10] The last big issue is about incident and breaches. How to deal with them? It starts with a complete protection and prevention program: breach identification is necessary, as well as a permanent cybersecurity control through bounty programs for example. Because risks cannot be all avoided, companies must have solid and very-well processed incident response plans to anticipate costs, resources and decisions related to every possible breach situation[11].

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Plassard, E. (2019). How can companies comply with 2018 GDPR regulation while earning benefits? PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Plassard-compliance-with-GDPR-while-earning-benefits.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Etienne Plassard

Paris, France

 

 

 

Etienne Plassard is a Master 2 graduate student in Project Management with one year of professional experience in recruitment and project management. Born in Côte d’Or in France, he studied mathematics, geography and economy in France, and then entered SKEMA Business School in Lille, France. He studied capital markets and accountability in Canada for 6 months, and then went to Brazil to study project management. He has been accredited PRINCE2 and AgilePM in December 2018. He is currently working for a consulting firm as a Business technology & integration consultant in Paris. He is publishing his first Student Paper under the tutorage of Dr Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE (#1240), MScPM, MRICS, Senior Technical Advisor (Project Management) to PT Mitratata Citragraha. (PTMC), Jakarta, Indonesia.

Etienne lives in Paris, France and can be contacted at etienne.plassard@hotmail.fr

 

[1] Edward Gately, 80 Percent of Companies Still Not GDPR-Compliant (2018, July). Retrieved from: https://www.channelpartnersonline.com/2018/07/13/80-percent-of-companies-still-not-gdpr-compliant/

[2] What are the main differences between the GDPR and the Data Protection Act? Conducted by Virtual College (2018, January). Retrieved from: https://www.virtual-college.co.uk/news/virtual-college/2018/01/the-differences-between-gdpr-and-data-protection

[3] Is Your Company Ready for a Big Data Breach? Conducted by Ponemon Institute (2013, April) Retrieved from http://www.experian.com/assets/data-breach/brochures/2014-ponemon-2nd-annual-preparedness.pdf

[4] 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report, 11th edition, conducted by Verizon (2018). Retrieved from: http://www.documentwereld.nl/files/2018/Verizon-DBIR_2018-Main_report.pdf

[5] Laxmi Sharma, GDPR: After 25th May, What Medium And Long-Term Actions? (2018, June). Retrieved from: https://www.smartdatacollective.com/gdpr-25th-what-medium-long-term-actions/

[6] Daniel Mintz, The Road to Becoming GDPR Compliant Leads to Log Term Success, (2018, October). Retrieved from: http://www.dataversity.net/road-becoming-gdpr-compliant-leads-long-term-success/

[7] John Tomaszewski, “Opening Clauses” in the GDPR – It Might Not Be As Easy As We Thought (2017, July). Retrieved from: https://www.globalprivacywatch.com/2017/07/opening-clauses-and-the-gdpr-it-might-not-be-as-easy-as-we-thought/

[8] Lei Shen, Rebecca Eisner, Updating Your Vendor Agreements to Comply With GDPR (2017, March). Retrieved from: https://iapp.org/news/a/updating-your-vendor-agreements-to-comply-with-gdpr/

[9] Recital 26 EU GPDR, (2018, September). Retrieved from: http://www.privacy-regulation.eu/en/recital-26-GDPR.htm

[10] How To Monetize Your Data? produced by Lotame (2018, February). Retrieved from: https://www.lotame.com/how-to-monetize-your-data/

[11] Elizabeth Kemery Sipes, Bryan Cave, Joshua James, Current data security issues for financial services firms (n.d). Retrieved from: https://www-emeraldinsight-com.ezp.skema.edu/doi/full/10.1108/JOIC-07-2016-0034

 

 

Risk Management in Dairy Contracting

A Study in France, Australia, and the United States

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Angel Tania

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France & Indonesia

 


 

ABSTRACT

Dairy products are consumed on a daily basis by people all over the world. The dairy consumption is forecasted to grow to 234 metric tons by the year 2021[1]. Despite the growth, this industry faces challenges. This paper discusses the risks in dairy contracting found in France, Australia and the United States; what are the risks in contracts within the projects in the dairy industry? What factors trigger those risks? How can we improve the contract clauses so that a fairer agreement to all parties can be achieved? Through cause-and-effect analysis, the root causes of the risks are identified. Then, multi-attribute decision-making model is used to determine the best solution to manage these risks based on Project Management method. Thereafter, Force-Field analysis is used to identify best practices in dairy contracting based on the practices done in the aforementioned three countries. In the end, it can be concluded that the government possesses a vital role in dairy contracting fairness, especially in establishing standards and protecting all stakeholders involved.

Keywords: Contract Management, Challenges, Dispute, Conciliation, Pricing, Contract Fairness, Milk Quota, Risk Transfer

INTRODUCTION

Despite a period of turbulence the global dairy sector is currently facing, “the global demand forecast for dairy is expected to increase by 2.5% annually to 2020”. This expected rise is mainly driven by the rising population and their changing diets towards receiving more of their calories from proteins, especially dairy products[2]. In regards to the growth, it is indisputable that the dairy industry has suffered from numerous scandals in recent times. Modern customer’s value when making food choices has also evolved. Customer nowadays weighs in the factor of health, wellness, and social impact while making their buying decision. It is due to these reasons that the dairy sector has been attempting to innovate, and one of the ways to achieve that is through projects. “Milk producers are cooperating with research organizations and universities through several projects to enhance their knowledge about the composition of dairy products so that new options for adding value to milk and its components can be offered to customers”[3].

With an escalation in the number of projects within the dairy industry, the project management knowledge has been more important than ever. The term project itself has been defined in various ways. According to the Global Alliance of Project Performance Standards (GAPPS), a project could be “the preparation of the feasibility study, the creation of a research report for a consumer products company, or the implementation of a new information technology system.”[4] The International Project Management Association (IPMA) describes a project as a “unique, temporary, multi-disciplinary and organised endeavour to realise agreed deliverables within predefined requirements and constraints.”[5] Therefore project management, according to the Wideman’s Glossary of Project Management Terms can be defined as “the process of directing and coordinating human and material resources throughout the project lifespan to achieve established objectives of scope, quality, time, cost, and stakeholder satisfaction.”[6] This definition includes the management of resources in order to achieve objective. Thus, one of the essential factors that need to be organised in projects is contract management. Managing resources within project requires the project manager to comprehend the globally applied fundamentals of contract and procurement of resources. Especially in the dairy industry where numerous stakeholders are involved ranging from government, companies, farmers, to consumers. A well-established contract management within projects can help the project managers to manage risk, perform strategic alignment, manage complexities, and increase the project success[7].

Project management in dairy sector is involved in a complex environment, in which many stakeholders are involved, there are numerous requirements from the government and trade union, and volatility of price can impact the project at any time. One of these complexities also include the challenges posed by the contracts formulated within the project[8]. Figure 1 depicts the four root causes analysis of the elements that possess a big impact on contract management in projects within the dairy sector.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Tania, A. (2019). Risk Management in Dairy Contracting: A Study in France, Australia, and the United States, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Tania-Risk-Management-in-Dairy-Contracting.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Angel Tania

Lille, France

 

 

 

Angel Tania is a Project Management professional with Finance background. Born in the world’s largest archipelago, Indonesia, she was granted a scholarship to pursue her Bachelor’s degree at Hogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen (University of Applied Science) in the Netherlands, majoring in International Finance & Control. During her study, she had the chance to work as a trainee in the biggest dairy company in the Netherlands; Royal Friesland Campina, before being hired as an external Business Process consultant at TNT Express (now a subsidiary of FedEx). She also pursued a minor degree in Risk Management and Entrepreneurship at Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland before embarking on a further master study at SKEMA Business School, France.

Angel lives in Lille, France and can be contacted at ursulangeltania16@gmail.com

 

[1] Dairy Industry Overview. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.statista.com/topics/4649/dairy-industry/

[2] McMahon, M. (2017). Challenges and Opportunities in the Dairy Sector. Retrieved from https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/ie/Documents/ConsumerBusiness/ie_Dairy_Industry_Trends_and_Opportunities.pdf

[3] Research in the area Dairy Science and Technology. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.wur.nl/en/Research-Results/Projects-and-programmes/Dairy/Research.htm

[4] GAPPS. (2007). A Framework for Performance Based Competency Standards for Global Level 1 and 2 Project Managers. Sydney: Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards. Retrieved from https://globalpmstandards.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/GAPPS_Project_Manager_v1.1150411_A4.pdf

[5] Schoper, Y., & Viehbacher, A. (2015). Individual Competence Baseline for Project Management. IPMA. Retrieved from http://products.ipma.world/ipma-product/icb/read-icb/

[6] Wideman, M. (2018). Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms v5.5. Retrieved from http://www.maxwideman.com/pmglossary/PMG_P16.htm#Project%20Management

[7] Graham, R. (2018). Contract Management Skills for Project Managers – PMO Perspectives. Retrieved from https://www.strategyex.co.uk/blog/pmoperspectives/contract-management-skills-for-project-managers/

[8] Vavra, P. (2009). Role, Usage, and Motivation for Contracting in Agriculture. OECD Food, Agriculture, and Fisheries Working Papers. Retrieved from https://www.oecd.org/tad/agricultural-trade/43057136.pdf

 

 

Dispute Resolution when Negotiating

and Contracting IT Outsourcing Contracts

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Sophie Malherbe

SKEMA Business School

Chambourcy, France

 


 

ABSTRACT

An Information Technology subcontracting relationship can meet many issues, which can arise during the pre-contractual phase or the already-started business relationship. This fact shows that there is a strong important to choose adapted clauses and provisions when writing the contract and a key verification of all the details to do during the whole contracting process.

Then, the main objective of this paper is to give both parties, the IT supplier and the customer company, the key elements essential to protect their interests and their projects.

When willing to enter or entering into an IT outsourcing contract with an IT supplier, a customer company has to secure its contract from its negotiation, thanks to prevention and cooperation, to the signature of the agreement. On the other hand, if unfortunately a dispute arises after both parties entered into their legal IT relationship, it is recommended to them to have implemented the “Dispute Resolution” clause providing them to use the Standing Neutral alternative solution. This option generally makes the parties saving costs and time, beneficing of a neutral and very competent third party familiar with the contract’s environment (projects, relationship, privacy, etc.).

Keywords: Dispute, Contracts, Management, Solution, Information Technology, Outsourcing, Subcontracting, Negotiating

INTRODUCTION

Because of the acceleration of the digitalization of business processes, more and more companies all over the world start or already have projects of software development. These projects are generally part of development portfolios to make a company more competitive: it is a strategic key point (Figure 1[1]). “In response, the organization as a whole and its IT group in particular has to continuously evolve to be more agile and robust[2].

Figure 1: Why IT development and implementation within a company is strategic?[3]

To achieve this Digital Transformation, thanks to their software development, some companies, such as IBM, create their own software, use it personally and sell it to other companies. Otherwise, some other companies do Information Technology (IT) outsourcing which is “the subcontracting of a part of all of the IT function of a company to an external outsourcing vendor[4].

Outsourcing has profoundly evolved over time. Now, more than being a way to externalize the production in order to minimize manufacturing costs thanks to third parties, it entails “several strategically important functions: from technological innovation to logistics, customer relations to post-sales services[5].

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Malherbe, S. (2019). Dispute Resolution when Negotiating and Contracting IT Outsourcing Contracts, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Malherbe-dispute-resolution-for-IT-outsourcing-contracts.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Sophie Malherbe

Chambourcy, France

 

 

 

Sophie Malherbe is a Global Project Management professional with Law background. Born in the Human Rights’ country, France, she has a Dual Bachelor’s degree in French Law and Common Law from the University of Nanterre (Law School). During her study, in 2017, she had the opportunity to work as a Junior Project Manager at Vivatechnology, a joint-venture created by Maurice Levy (Publicis Group) and Francis Morel (Les Échos, LVMH). She trained herself for six months to become a great and efficient future Project Manager by participating in the organization of a worldwide meeting between startups, investors and big companies from around the whole globe.

She pursued her education by starting to study at SKEMA Business School (France) in 2017. Since she joined this 7th best-ranked French Business School, she already had the chance to enroll for a study semester in Belo Horizonte (SKEMA’s Brazilian campus in partnership with the Fundação Dom Cabral, being a world-class Brazilian business school). She now studies Global Project Management in the Master of Sciences “Project and Programme Management and Business Development” at SKEMA Business School (Lille campus France). She is actually completed her last assignments and took the opportunity to further her education by a way of a distance learning mentoring course, under the tutorage of Dr Paul D. Giammalvo, to obtain her International Contract Management degree.

Sophie lives in Chambourcy, France and can be contacted at sophie.malherbe@skema.edu.

To find other information about Sophie Malherbe, visit her LinkedIn profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/sophie-malherbe-skemabusinessschool-projectmanagement-it/

 

[1] “Information Technology Strategy and Management: Best Practices” – Chew, Eng K – Retrieved from https://books.google.fr/books?id=oOYioSahlYgC&pg=PT330&lpg=PT330&dq=Strategies+for+dispute+prevention+and+management+in+IT+outsourcing+arrangements&source=bl&ots=oOcnF0Vn5d&sig=LDwL4TP6oeG8Dr7-trHUrK8pYWw&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjexdHfyNveAhUvzoUKHSiKCRA4ChDoATAFegQIBxAB#v=onepage&q&f=false

[2] “Information Technology Strategy and Management: Best Practices” – Chew, Eng K – Retrieved from https://books.google.fr/books?id=oOYioSahlYgC&pg=PT330&lpg=PT330&dq=Strategies+for+dispute+prevention+and+management+in+IT+outsourcing+arrangements&source=bl&ots=oOcnF0Vn5d&sig=LDwL4TP6oeG8Dr7-trHUrK8pYWw&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjexdHfyNveAhUvzoUKHSiKCRA4ChDoATAFegQIBxAB#v=onepage&q&f=false

[3] “Information Technology Strategy and Management: Best Practices: Best Practices” – Chew, Eng K – Retrieved from https://books.google.fr/books?id=oOYioSahlYgC&pg=PT330&lpg=PT330&dq=Strategies+for+dispute+prevention+and+management+in+IT+outsourcing+arrangements&source=bl&ots=oOcnF0Vn5d&sig=LDwL4TP6oeG8Dr7-trHUrK8pYWw&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjexdHfyNveAhUvzoUKHSiKCRA4ChDoATAFegQIBxAB#v=onepage&q&f=false

[4] “Information systems outsourcing: issues and evidence” – K. Altinkemer, A. Chaturvedi, R. Gulati – Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0268401294900035

[5] “Outsourcing strategies. How to formalize and negotiate the outsourcing contract”, Pallicelli Michela and Meo-Colombo Carlotta – Retrieved from  https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/6294468.pdf

 

 

Advancement of Drones in Electrical Transmission

and Distribution Construction

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Pandya Brijalkumar Hasmukhlal

SKEMA Business School

Lille, France & India

 


 

ABSTRACT

The advancement of new equipment for construction of electrical transmission and distribution line is essential for safety, cost and time. The drone technology enhances the construction field with their enormous benefits as compared to their traditional method for the power lines construction. This article gives a prologue to drone technology innovation and give perspective result for technical specification, surveying and accurate measurement in construction and eliminate use of heavy air-craft. The primary viewpoints that have prompted the substantial spread of drone technology in construction of power lines are examined and here compared with their traditional methods with evolution with some technique like MADM, quantitative representation, relative weighing and additive weighing and then choose the best methods which provides strong position for attributes that consider for the subject. Although all methods are relatively important on its way of use but comparison between them made easy selection for most benefits for use. The iterative methods already show that the drone technology proven best practice for construction of power lines in terms of time, cost, risk, size, location, quality and environment sustainability.

Key words:   Aircraft/ Transmission and distribution/ Construction/ Infrastructure/ Expensive/ Cost effective/Power sector

INTRODUCTION

Every year increasing demand in energy for domestic and industries create alarming situation for infrastructure of transmit and distribute it. Though construction of power line is not much easier as it looks. “Around 30 to 50 workers in every 1,00,000 are killed on the jobs every year and many others suffer from non-fatal loss of limbs from electrical burns and mechanical trauma which is almost twice fatality rate than police officers and fireman”[1]. Moreover, the capital cost of construction is also expensive due to pre-construction inspection crew, transportation, helicopter and ground crew. Advancement in technology booming power sector also by using drones in construction, inspection and maintenance for energy lines and remarkable cost cutting in operations. This all reasons need some innovative alternative for construction of T&D lines.

Fish bone analysis for innovation in construction of T&D[2]

Using drones in construction of energy transmission line is not fairy tales now it is in infancy, but future of this technology is very enormous. In recent past, “Sharper shape and skyskopes, in cooperation with an investor-owned utility, have completed the project regarding string shock line installation of 765kv transmission power line successfully in USA”[3]. The main concern of this project is showing to world that drone technology have many applications than basic inspection with respect to safety, efficiency and cost-effective. Sock pulling, the act of strong and lightweight rope and connecting it to towers, is traditionally completed by helicopter and ground crew involve great risk to aircraft pilot and member of ground crews. Drone technology eliminating typical complex process and divided into sub process of reattaching string and minimize the risk of injury for involved people. This is not small issue, approximately 1.5 deaths every year from helicopter crews trying to perform same task but using drones and expertise pilot, task done with maximum cost effectiveness and with no risk of injury to manned aircraft. According to Guild control of project Compendium and references for managing change “Identify what a change is and understand how to demonstrate the impact will have on our projects”[4] so, here impact of drone technology in construction of power lines is very clear and based on advantages decision making is also easy by facts and results in terms of safety, cost and operation as well.

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Author Hasmukhlal, P.B. (2019). Advancement of Drones in Electrical Transmission and Distribution Construction, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Hasmukhlal-drones-in-electrical-transmission-construction.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Pandya Brijalkumar Hasmukhlal

India and France

 

 

 

 Pandya Brijalkumar Hasmukhlal, MSC in “Project and Programme Management and Business Development (PPMBD)” at SKEMA Business School, Lille Campus. As a part of a key module “The International Contract Management” qualification requirement under the direct supervision of Professor. Paul D Giammalvo, PhD, CDT, CCP, MScPM, MRICS, GPM-m Senior Technical Advisor, PT Mitrata Citragraha, the course director and the Professor. Paul Gardiner, The Program Director. He graduated from the Sankalchand patel college of Engineering, approved by AICTE (All India Council of Technical Education) and affiliated to Hemchandracharya north Gujarat University, Patan, Gujarat, India and holds a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering. He has worked at Eurocircuits India Pvt Ltd., Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India as a Production Engineer in the year 2014 to 2018. He has a background in Production and Design Engineering in Electrical & Electronic Industry. He speaks fluent English, Gujarati, Hindi, and basic French.

Pandya Brijalkumar can be contacted at brijalkumar.pandya@skema.edu Or LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/brijal-pandya-9a360a170/

 

[1] Ore, Timothy. (1996, June). Electrical Fatalities Among U.S. Construction Workers: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Retrieved from https://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/1996/06000/Electrical_Fatalities_Among_U_S__Construction.9.aspx

[2]     By author October 2018

[3] Sharpershape. (2017). Transmission line construction | Sharper Shape Inc. Retrieved from https://sharpershape.com/energy-industry-services/transmission-line-construction

[4]Guild of project controls compendium and references. (2015, November 2). GUILD OF PROJECT CONTROLS COMPENDIUM and REFERENCE (CaR) | Project Controls – planning, scheduling, cost management and forensic analysis (Planning Planet). Retrieved from http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-change

 

 

The redaction of fair cancellation and recording clauses

in the music event sector

 

STUDENT PAPER

By Chloé Forget

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 

ABSTRACT

Music event sector is highly risky due to the uncertainty and temporary aspects, therefore cancellation and recording clauses are crucial for risk management in music vents contracts. This paper studies the redaction of cancellation and recording clauses in the music event contract. In this article, we analyze five different contract templates (AIA, FIDIC, CONSENSUS, EJCDC and CSI contracts) to figure out which alternative will be the best option to redact fair cancellation and recording clauses between an organizer of event and the artist manager. Our researches demonstrated that the CSI contract is the best template to redact fair cancellation and recording clauses thanks to relation of power abut both parties, that are equals in this contract, and the compensations process, that is fair and fast for both parties.

Keywords:     music events; music contract; production contracts; cancellation issue; recording artists; event cancellation; producer responsibilities; event organizer obligations; penalties

INTRODUCTION

Last year I bought two tickets for Shakira’s concert in Paris but just one week before the date, she announced she would not be able to perform the show. It was a complete surprise for me, and, for instance, I didn’t know what was going to happen with the purchase I made but also, I started wondering about other issues. For example, have you ever asked yourself what would happen to both of the parties of a contract if the artist doesn’t show up for his/her show? Have you ever asked yourself if you are authorized to record on video the show with your cell phone? It seems so natural for all of us to go to a concert, enjoy ourselves when our artist arrives on the stage, take photos and videos, post them on our preferred social network, and many other things that we always take for granted.

However, each musical event requires lots of previous work that can take weeks, or even months, for setting up a contract between the artist’s manager and the event organizer. Without a contract, the artist will have no more than a moral obligation to perform the show he/she was paid for and the organizer will have no obligation to protect the copyright of the artist. The artist will lose his/her artistic property (or at least, part of the revenues for his/her performance) and the organizer will lose money and damage its brand image by paying to someone who is not coming. Hence both parties need to find an agreement and write it down in order to make it applicable in a trial, whenever one of them doesn’t fulfill his/her duties. A contract is essential because it warrants that all the parties involved will act as it was previously decided and respect their responsibilities (commitments). According to the article “8 Issues to Know and Address Before Sign a Music Producer Contract” of McDonald, H [1], discussing the terms of a contract is a very difficult task because all the situations should have been considered by the parties, and here is where the main goal of the contract clauses reveals. In particular, the clauses indicate specific situations and will specify the penalties that would be applicable in each particular case. What does make difficult the implementation of cancellation clause and recording clause?

According to the website Symphonic, “Music event are fully part of project management area.”[2] Indeed, each event done in music sector imply a project management structure and its attributes. According to the size of the event, music event can require a portfolio structure to realize the event. For example, a music festival that last several days include several projects, in the way that each concert of this festival may be a project inside this portfolio. What make the project management sector specific for cancellation clause and recording clause?

In this essay, we will focus on two clauses that are essential, but also problematic, for any kind of music event: the cancellation clause and the recording clause. Moreover, it is precisely their essential character what makes them problematic because a lot of things are at stake on their formulation.

For instance, if the artist cancels his/her performance, then, it is very likely that the whole event, that may include more participants, will be canceled immediately as well. Thus, the organizer would have probably to deal with the other commitments that he/she acquired with the stakeholders and with all the clients who paid for the show. In the same way, a recording of the performance, even a partial one, could damage the artist-intellectual property if it is not controlled by a specific regulation provided by the organizer. To avoid these and many other problems, the clauses must be discussed, and penalties must be defined to enforce the duties of both the artist’s agent and the organizer.

The purpose of this essay is to evaluate what is the most efficient way of writing down the cancellation and recording clauses for the parties involved in a contract in such a manner that respects, but also enforces, the obligations acquired between each other when they engage in a contract the pursues the common goal of performing and/or organizing a music event.

This essay will answer to: How cancellation and recording clauses can be fairly redacted in a music contract?

This question will be analyzed by using the Five Whys Funnel Analysis thanks to the following questions:

  • Why do we need the cancellation clause and recording clause?
  • Why are there risks in music events?
  • Why music events are uncertain sectors?
  • Why music contracts need to consider project management attributes in order to redact cancellation clause and recording clauses?
  • Why is it complex to define the most important attributes for cancellation and recording clauses in music events?

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Forget, C. (2019). The redaction of fair cancellation and recording clauses in music event sector, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Forget-fair-cancellation-and-recording-in-music-event-sector.pdf

 


 

About the Author


Chloé Forget

Paris, France

 

 

 

Chloé Forget is an Msc student from SKEMA Business School. She is currently studying Project Program Management & Business Development. Before that, she studied 4 years global management in the same business school. French native but she grew up in a multicultural environment thanks to her travels (Spain, the UK, Germany, Tunisia, Morocco, Turkey, Peru, …). It was thus only natural she decided to study abroad. She studied in Fundação dom cabral in Brazil, and in North Carolina State University in the USA. She has experience in project management for being responsible for a music festival in France and in development of new products in a tourism agency in Mexico. As a project management student, she recently obtained PRINCE 2, Agile PM and IPMA certifications.

Chloé lives in Paris and can be contacted by email at chloe.forget@skema.edu

 

[1] McDonald, H. (2009, May 16). 8 Issues to Know and Address Before Sign a Music Producer Contract. Retrieved from https://www.thebalancecareers.com/before-you-sign-a-music-producer-contract-2460647

[2] Legal Contracts for Music Producers I Symphonic Distribution. (2018, September 21). Retrieved from http://blog.symphonicdistribution.com/2017/06/legal-contracts-music-producers/

 

 

Managing and Controlling Construction Delays

using Guild Management Techniques

 

STUDENT PAPER

By RAMA SUBBU Naveen Aravind

SKEMA Business School

Paris, France

 


 

ABSTRACT

The construction industry is a noteworthy catalyst to the development of the country’s financial advancement. The frequent delay of the substantial construction project has been a wonder and it impacts the execution of the vital planning. This paper introduces the discoveries of study of prevailing reason for delays in construction project in the point of view of project management. The outcome uncovered that the five most huge defer causes as observed by were income and budgetary troubles looked by contractual workers, temporary worker’s poor site management, deficient contractual worker encounter, lack of site specialists and inadequate arranging and booking by contract workers. All the causes are gathered into 5 main causes such as 1) project category, which grouped factors related with the project itself; (2)human category, involving the factors affecting the laborers;(3) management or organizational category for those factors referred to planning, management, scheduling and supervising issues; (4) materials and tools category, grouping factors related with the supply or shortage of materials, tools, equipment or machinery; and finally (5) environmental factors category[1]. Ideally, the discoveries of this examination will at any rate shade a few lights to the issues looked by expansive development venture and exertion can be taken to enhance it.

Keywords:      Construction, Control, Delay, Planning, Project Management, Time Overrun, Building Information Modeling (BIM)

INTRODUCTION

Construction is one of the major industries worldwide.”[2] The construction industry is about to reach an “estimated $10.5 trillion by the next 5 years, and it is forecast to grow at 4.2% from 2018 to 2023.[3]” Although development extends worldwide in developing countries construction industry faces major issues with the delay in construction is one of the significant issues. According to the Guild of Project Controls Compendium and Reference (GPCCAR) “the construction stages, operates through the life span such as 1. Owner practitioner 2. EPCC or Design>Build Contractor and 3. “Design>Bid>Build” or Firm Fixed Price Contractor[4]

Figure 1. Process grouping in Project life span phases[5]

In this the owner practitioner operates throughout the Asset life cycle. And the contractor practitioner operates in a smaller cycle i.e. within the project life cycle. In figure 1 phases 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 represents the “Asset life cycle” and only three phases represent “Project life cycle”. Phase 1 is exploring several concepts i.e. to brainstorm several concepts, ideas and developing the initial schedules, cost estimates and budgets. Phase 2 is doing the feasible analysis on all the best ideas and narrow it to 2 to 3 best suitable options. In phase 3 select the best options that suits the project with all the stakeholders and practitioners. This is the starting of the “project life cycle”. Step 4 is the initiation of the project. Refine the project plan, scope, risk, schedule and budget in this phase. Phase 5 is to execute the project as per the plan. The phases 6 and 7 are the “Operate” and “Disposal” phases. Since Project Control specialists can assume two jobs – as Subject Matter Experts (Phases 1, 2, 6 and 7) OR as Key Project Team Members (Phases 3, 4 and 5) our jobs and duties will change and will be characterized by the requirements of the project sponsors and additionally project managers, contingent on the stage we are in. Despite which stage we are in, the essential expectations that we are dependable to create are information and the related examination and projections to empower that Phase to advance.[6]

More…

To read entire paper, click here

 

Editor’s note: Student papers are authored by graduate or undergraduate students based on coursework at accredited universities or training programs.  This paper was prepared as a deliverable for the course “International Contract Management” facilitated by Dr Paul D. Giammalvo of PT Mitratata Citragraha, Jakarta, Indonesia as an Adjunct Professor under contract to SKEMA Business School for the program Master of Science in Project and Programme Management and Business Development.  http://www.skema.edu/programmes/masters-of-science. For more information on this global program (Lille and Paris in France; Belo Horizonte in Brazil), contact Dr Paul Gardiner, Global Programme Director paul.gardiner@skema.edu.

How to cite this paper: Aravind, R.S.N. (2019). Managing and Controlling Construction Delays using Guild Management Techniques, PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Aravind-managing-and-controlling-construction-delays.pdf

 


 

About the Author


RAMA SUBBU Naveen Aravind

Paris, France

 

 

Naveen Aravind is a Civil Engineering professional with 2+ years of experience in construction and construction management. Born in Tamil Nadu, India, he studied Engineering practices and gained a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering in India, before starting his master’s degree he worked as a civil engineer in India for 2 years and then he got an opportunity to work in an International exposure as a Civil Engineer in Oil and Gas sector in Oman. He further continued his studies by doing master’s in project management and Business Development in France. In his course he was doing International Contract Management under the tutorage of Dr Paul D. Giammalvo, CDT, CCE, MScPM, MRICS, GPM-m Senior Technical Advisor, PT Mitrata Citragraha, to attain Guild of Project Controls certification.

Naveen Aravind lives in Paris, France and can be contacted at aravindhnaveen1@gmail.com

 

[1] Labor Productivity in the Construction Industry -Factors Influencing the Spanish Construction Labor Productivity. (2018). Retrieved from https://waset.org/publications/9999560/labor-productivity

[2] World Construction Industry | Economy Watch. (2018). Retrieved from http://www.economywatch.com/world-industries/construction/world.htm

[3] Markets, R. (2018). Growth Opportunities for the Global Construction Industry 2018-2023 – A Potential $10.5 Trillion Market. Retrieved from https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/growth-opportunities-for-the-global-construction-industry-2018-2023—a-potential-105-trillion-market-300578103.html

[4]GUILD OF PROJECT CONTROLS COMPENDIUM and REFERENCE (CaR) | Project Controls – planning, scheduling, cost management and forensic analysis (Planning Planet). (2018). Retrieved from http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

[5] GUILD OF PROJECT CONTROLS COMPENDIUM and REFERENCE (CaR) | Project Controls – planning, scheduling, cost management and forensic analysis (Planning Planet). (2018). Retrieved from http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

[6] GUILD OF PROJECT CONTROLS COMPENDIUM and REFERENCE (CaR) | Project Controls – planning, scheduling, cost management and forensic analysis (Planning Planet). (2018). Retrieved from http://www.planningplanet.com/guild/gpccar/introduction-to-managing-project-controls

 

 

On the Subject of John Schlichter’s recent articles

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

 

31 July 2019

Sir,

In 1999, John Schlichter introduced me to the value and personal satisfaction of volunteering in PMI. I then contributed to his pioneering work on OPM3 for several years. His current series of articles (“Alexander and the Indian King”) is clearly based on a powerful vision and a sincere desire to ensure that PMI can continue to cater for the needs of its members and of project management in general, in an ever-changing world. I would therefore like to add a few supporting examples and comments to those articles and the issues that they address.

1) The takeover of international conferences by the corporate organization (after the great success of international conferences organized by the national chapters with support from PMI at the start of the millennium) and the similar disbanding of the volunteer-run SIGs. In each case, much of the enjoyment and spontaneity of the volunteers has been squeezed out in favour of heavy (and somewhat irrelevant and disrespectful) administrative control. PMI volunteers are still involved, but their influence is considerably restricted.

2) On the specific example of conferences, in the last few years, potential speakers have been treated with much less respect than in the past: no justification is provided when a submission is rejected. If the paper is accepted, the presenter is required to spend additional time and effort to provide PMI staff with “story-board” versions of their presentation in a format that is unusable as a presentation. The effort on both sides would be better spent on encouraging each presenter to provide a formal paper on their topic as part of the review process and for subsequent publication on the Web. These proceedings would improve the credibility of the speaker and the congress, as well as providing longer-term value for PMI members.

3) I had considered invoking clause 4.2.1 from the PMI Code of Ethics – that every PMI member and certification-holder has to sign – to ensure that PMI provided this currently missing feedback to all rejected speakers: “as practitioners in the global project management community: We demonstrate transparency in our decision-making process.” However, it turns out that PMI staff do not sign the same code of ethics; they have a “code of behaviour”! This dichotomy raises a set of fascinating metaphysical questions and highlights a risk of double standards (the member Code of Ethics vs. the employee Code of Conduct) within a single community and does nothing to encourage effective teamwork.

4) PMI severely limits the reuse of any material published in the PMI standards, despite the fact that all of this material is the result of thousands of hours of unpaid volunteer creative work. These restrictions limit the right of course-developers to reproduce diagrams and figures or to use extracts from the text of the standards. Naturally, these restrictions do not apply to courses that PMI might choose to create and deliver in competition to commercial Registered Education Providers.

The solution to these issues is already available. As the Agile movement has taught us, placing your trust in the team and limiting interference and administrative overheads leads to increased creativity, motivation and commitment. As John Schlichter wrote in his first article in the series: PMI should recast its values in a way the prioritizes “institutionalizing project management by focusing exclusively on delivering only those products and services that PMI alone can furnish in its role as the premiere trade association for project management.” Growth should be used only as an indicator of success and not an end in itself: growth should arise from the value that PMI provides, and not from the power that it wields.

Yours,

Crispin (“Kik”) Piney, PMP, PgMP, PfMP

South of France

P.S. My critiques have been prompted by my abiding affection for PMI, reaching back over two decades and my aim to save PMI from becoming just yet another commercial organization. As the French say: ”qui aime bien châtie bien”. Kik

 

References

Schlichter, J.  (2019). Alexander and the Indian King: Part 3; PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Schlichter-Alexander-and-the-Indian-King-Part3.pdf

Schlichter, J.  (2019). Alexander and the Indian King: Part 2; PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VI, July. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/pmwj83-Jul2019-Schlichter-Alexander-and-Indian-King-Part2-2.pdf

Schlichter, J.  (2019). Alexander and the Indian King: Part 1; PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue V, June.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/pmwj82-Jun2019-Schlichter-Alexander-and-Indian-King-Part1-2.pdf

 

 

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