The Power of Project Leadership

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: The Power of Project Leadership: 7 keys to help you transform from project manager to project leader
Author: Susanne Madsen
Publisher: KoganPage
List Price: $28.47
Format: Soft cover, 265 pages
Publication Date: January 2015
ISBN: 978-0-7494-7234-4
Reviewer: Muhammad Umar Tariq
Review Date: November 2018

 


 

Preface

The title of this book “The Power of Project Leadership” Tells us half of the idea for how we can transform a good project manager into Good project leader; it also tends to the requirement for administration in the present fast paced world with cutting edge and different comes. I expected a book about administration hypothesis anyway; what I got was an extraordinary sensible manual for truly doing initiative with bunches of stories, models and activities. Extraordinary book, incredible writing skills open door with the end goal to assess their authority and administration abilities. It Strengthen the commence that the present venture director is anticipated to attempt and support less. This Book was exceptionally clear, simple to study and offered numerous tips with the end goal to enhance your Project initiative aptitudes

Synopsis of Book’s Structure

The message all through the book is straightforward; the manner in which we are as venture directors are conveying ventures isn’t working. Project disappointments are high and it’s an extraordinary worry for our clients. (Section 2) portrays that how we can enhance our task administration aptitudes. Turning a camera on your administration abilities can be troublesome. Susanne’s methodology is deliberate and can encourage people to see their qualities and shortcomings reliably. The dialog about the enabling mindset is awesome. I believe that one in everything about key authority learnings is that you essentially will administration your own reaction to occasions and having an inspirational attitude will make propelled things less demanding to oversee.

(Part # 3) The seven keys to extend administration made reference to inside the book, are important and extremely rational. The information provided for everything about keys is helpful and handy now not just a bundle of axioms. By method for grasping those seven keys, you may roll out excellent improvement and enhance your task initiative. You set the pace, make little incremental alterations or cross substantial something, you do your gathering and your partners might be amazed

(Part 4) gives a theoretical on executing the data shown in past sections. The maker additionally elucidates how to incite liberated of the antiquated ways that have not been serving and uses these gadgets to understand the expanded objective.

Climax

The Power of Project Leadership gives a basic however viable manual for enhancing your venture authority abilities. I like the strategy for getting physical exercises to reinforce the critical things, picking up information of impacts and real presence models from venture directors. Susanne has moreover given a website that gives supplemental texture alongside agendas, moving recordings and diverse reference substances. Here is a site http://www.powerofprojectleadership.com/

Highlights What I liked!

Chapter three has a lot to supply for a project manager and leadership. UN agency is willing to be told and check out new skills. I like how the author says nice leaders place their name in danger by adopting/trying out new ideas. Moreover, good leaders like to challenge, question, listen and realize that they do not have answers to all or any the queries.

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About the Reviewer


Muhammed Umar Tariq

Lahore, Pakistan

 

 

Graduate Holder with a Degree of BBA Hons from University of South Asia, Lahore, Pakistan. Currently doing Master in Business Administration from Same University, majoring in Management Sciences. Final thesis and Some Class project Mentions: Management and risk control of financial institutions, Global Marketing Situations, First Hybrid Car Introduced in Pakistan, E-Learning (Future of Online Education).

He holds Certification in Computerized Accounting and Certification in MS Foundation, and has delivered 10+ Presentations on Self Made Topics, Researches at University Level, participated in different types of Symposiums, Coaching Sessions & Motivational Lectures.

He is currently working at Daewoo Express Pakistan Head office as a Senior Executive in the Investment and Planning Department. Consistently achieved all the targets, Passionate about learning new skills, Developed strong skill set including in depth data and company management Expertise, Honed ability to manage conflict and deal with demanding individuals.

Academia and Public Profile links:
https://usea.academia.edu/UmarTariq
https://asklint.academia.edu/UmarTariq/
https://publons.com/researcher/1757867/muhammad-umar-tariq/

 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Project Management of Large Software-Intensive Systems

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Project Management of Large Software-Intensive Systems: Controlling the Software Development Process
Author:  Marvin Gechman
Publisher:  CRC Press
List Price: $99.95
Format:  Large paperback, 366 pages
Publication Date:  2019
ISBN: 978-0-367-13671-0
Reviewer: Lauren Puglisi, MBA, CAPM
Review Date: June 2019

 

 


 

Introduction

Marvin Gechman offers a “shopping list” of activities and tailoring for large software system developments. With over 57 years of software experience, including 34 in the aerospace industry, he was chosen in 1994 as “the person most responsible for Software Process Improvement” at Lockheed Martin.

Currently President at Escon Software and System Consulting, Mr. Gechman explains how scaling up from smaller projects may no longer be appropriate on large systems development. Working well by themselves, individual components, when interfaced with numerous other hardware and software, can become a System of Systems and difficult to integrate by scaling alone.

Although in a software-intensive system the software is the predominant factor, there are many other scaling considerations such as staff, budgets, deadlines, policies, regulations, procedures, and constraints.

Mr. Gechman states the results of the CHAOS Report, published by The Standish Group, 2016:

    • 32-35% of projects completed successfully
    • 19-24% were failures
    • Being late, over budget, or having fewer features challenged 44-49%

The principle of the book is to help project managers and their teams understand how to perform the intended system functions, make the integration seamless, and to increase success. This book deals with large systems and is advanced, technical and detailed.

Overview of Book’s Structure

As a good project manager would do, the author breaks down the information into six functional interactive domains: System, Software, Resources, Critical Elements, Quality, and Management.

The book is rich with definitions, acronyms, tables and figures. The figures are a visual expression of structures, functions, responsibilities, and project dependencies and hierarchies. Flowcharts assist with understanding complex interactions and the bibliography includes 185 references for further study.

There are also nine appendices with titles such as Criteria for Evaluating Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) and Reusable Software Products, and Software Roles and Responsibilities for Skill Groups.

Highlights

I have chosen one highlight from each of the sixteen chapters to offer a taste of what Mr. Gechman deems important.

  • Chapter 1: Software Project Management Introduction
    Success and failure depend on strategic planning.
  • Chapter 2: Software Project Management Activities
    Every large project should use an automated database for requirements management and traceability.
  • Chapter 3: System and Software Lifecycle Processes
    Failure can happen even when the system meets requirements and quality but has not been tested in the intended operational and  expected environment. (building a plane vs. flying it)

 More…

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About the Reviewer


Lauren Puglisi

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Lauren Puglisi, MBA, CAPM is an accountant, project management professional, and business analyst with 20 years of experience in the real estate and civil engineering fields.

Lauren can be contacted at www.linkedin.com/in/laurenpuglisimba

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review who agree to provide a review within 45 days; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Transforming Business

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Transforming Business with Program Management
Author:  Satish P. Subramanian
Publisher:  CRC Press
List Price:   $63.16
Format:  Hardcover, 222 pages
Publication Date:  2015
ISBN: 13-978-1-4665-9099-1
Reviewer: Deborah Reinagel, PMP
Review Date: June 2019

 


 

Introduction

This book demonstrates how Program Management can give organizations a competitive edge when implementing business transformation.  Subramanian illuminates how program management unites strategy, people, process, technology, structure, and measurement to drive and sustain business transformation. The book draws parallels between strategic planning and project management aimed to restructure current state business.  Subramanian provides strategies and techniques for organizations to utilize in pursuit of successfully transforming programs.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Satish Subramanian very clearly addresses the business case for writing this book, the benefit to implementing the processes shared, and risks from not following the process.  The book encompasses how organizations are employing program management to deliver the outcomes desired of complex, strategic, cross functional initiatives.  The book is composed of 12 chapters.  The first two chapters are meant to set the stage.  Chapter 1 gives the reader background of how we have come to need Program management and why businesses need to incorporate these methodologies to gain a competitive edge.  Chapter 2 then begins to give a synapse of the remaining book and how each chapter is organized.  Chapters 3 – 12 are dedicated to each of the 10 principles of program management.  The chapters dedicated to each of the 10 principles clearly explains the chapter key concept and submits an outline of the points supporting the concept to be further explained within the chapter.  Chapters are all supported with many visuals, objectives, benefits, a real-world case study and a chapter summary.

Highlights

Visual learners will appreciate the many illustrations to demonstrate key concepts throughout the book.  Additionally, the book provides examples of what a specific model would look like or a how to validate a process.  The book is easy to read and very fluid.  Every chapter utilizes the same chapter format making it easy to reference or refer back to key concepts regarding a process.  Chapters begin with a business case, followed by Key points, action items, expectations and closes with a real-life case study to provide backup for the principles discussed.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Deborah Reinagel, PMP

San Antonio, TX, USA

 

 

Deborah Reinagel is Director of Program Management for a Healthcare organization in San Antonio.  She has established a career history of improving business systems for a variety of industries by utilizing technology, data intelligence and project management best practices.  The business systems she has initiated increased performance and reduced cost.   Deborah is experienced in cultivating teams and building departments from scratch.  She has created new revenue streams and helped support business development teams with data analytics. She has received recognition for applying superior project management skills to improve business performance.

Deborah is an alumna from Texas A&M Corpus Christi with a BBA in Finance, PMP, and is a certified Six Sigma Green Belt.  In addition to serving as VP of Finance for the Alamo PMI Chapter, Deborah participates in the Alamo Chapter book review program. She can be contacted at deborahd832@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Alamo Chapter. Authors and publishers offer the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

 

The Complete Project Manager

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  The Complete Project Manager: Integrating People, Organizational, and Technical Skills
Authors:  Randall Englund, Alfonso Bucero
Publisher:  Management Concepts, Inc.
List Price:   $58.16
Format:  Paper, 273 pages
Publication Date:   2012    
ISBN: 978-1-56726-359-6
Reviewer: Valentina Rada, MBA, PMP, PMI-ACP
Review Date: July 2019

 


 

Introduction

The Complete Project Manager book outlines the variety of soft project management skills necessary for successful project management and shows the complexity of efficient project management. Project managers’ role is more than defining schedules, identifying risks, and engaging stakeholders; it’s about leadership, negotiations, fun, change management and so many other soft skills.

The authors, Randall Englund and Alfonso Bucero, two former senior project managers at Hewlett Packard, emphasize areas that make a project manager complete. They share their experiences and use them as examples throughout the book. From that perspective, The Complete Project Manager is a great blend of principles and real life experience. Key project management concepts are covered in simple but thoughtful manners that bring the reader to authors’ day to day project management experience.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book highlights key components of a complete project manager described metaphorically as a “complex molecule”. Similarly to how organic compounds are structurally diverse, project management is the application of knowledge, skills and techniques to execute projects effectively and efficiently. The book is a guide of how to build your own combination of “molecules” as your project management skill set.

The Complete Project Manager emphasizes how to integrate key people, organizational and technical skills. The authors outline the multitude of skill areas a complete project manager should leverage to be successful.

In the book are described and exemplified twelve of soft project management skills: 1) Leadership – be visionary; 2) Personal Skills – consider people interaction; 3) Humor – bring FUN on the agenda; 4) Project Management Skills – utilize PMI’s Project Management Body of Knowledge; 5) Environment Skills – create project-friendly environment conditions; 6) Organizational Skills – execute projects in “green” organizations rather than “toxic” ones; 7) Negotiating Skills – engage in negotiations; 8) Political Skills – be politically sensitive; 9) Conflict Management Skills – embrace constructive contention; 10) Sales Skills – sale the value of services and processes; 11) Change Management Skills – understand change management process; 12) Customer Knowledge – apply servant leadership skills.

Highlights

I really enjoyed how the authors of The Complete Project Manager portrait project managers’ role as being a blend of skills related to people, technical skills and culture. A project manager in order to be successful covers this entire spectrum. The authors allocate a good chunk of their journey to soft personal skills. The importance of relationships, networking, and political awareness is crucial for a complete project manager. It takes a lot farther than simply being technical competent or intelligent; it’s how one relates and persuades the relationship with others. As per this Chinese proverb, “The smart man knows everything; the wise man knows everyone”.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Valentina Rada

Texas, USA

 

 

 

Valentina Rada’s professional experience includes twenty years of experience in market research, retail and restaurant industries as research analyst and project manager. She is a Project Management Professional and an Agile Certified Practitioner. She has a Master in Business Administration from the University of the Incarnate Word. She is currently a Senior Project Manager for the City of San Antonio in Texas.

Valentina can be reached at valirada@hotmail.com or www.linkedin.com/in/valentina-rada

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Alamo Chapter. Authors and publishers offer the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Implementing Project and Program Benefit Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Implementing Project and Program Benefit Management
Author:  Kenn Dolan
Publisher:  CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group
List Price:  $69.95
Format:  Hardcover, 272 pages; Kindle version available
Publication Date:   2019              
ISBN: 978-1-4987-8639-3
Reviewer: Patt Chowdhury, MBA, MM, PMP
Review Date:  June 2019

 

 


 

Introduction

With the PMBOK Edition 6 placing a renewed emphasis on project benefits and benefits realization, Kenn Dolan comes to the rescue with a book that will provide a primer for project managers who need to learn more about project selection criteria and how to ensure the sponsor receives their expected benefits.

Implementing Project and Program Benefit Management is also valuable to experienced project managers who need a refresher on benefits and some new ideas on how to actually track benefits attainment. This is an excellent reference book, too, with clear examples in addition to the processes and formulas you need to know.

Overview of Book’s Structure

Implementing Project and Program Benefit Management has a hefty, detailed table of contents spanning seven pages so I will summarize the content here. After the Dedication, Contents, Preface, Acknowledgments, About the Author and the Introduction, there are three parts made up of eleven chapters, followed by two appendices, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, references and an index.

Part One: Establishing the Language

Chapter 1: What Are Benefits and Why Are They Important?

Chapter 2: Definitions and Terminology

Chapter 3: Team Roles and Responsibilities

Part Two: The Benefits Lifecycle

Chapter 4: Introduction to the Benefit Life Cycle

Chapter 5: Establish the Context

Chapter 6: Identify the Benefits

Chapter 7: Assess the Benefits

Chapter 8: Plan for Benefits Realization

Chapter 9: Coordinate and Realize the Benefits

Chapter 10: Review the Initiative

Part Three: Embedding the Practices

Chapter 11: Embedding Benefits Realization Management into Organizations

Appendix I: Documentation

Appendix II: Summary of Cognitive Biases Impacting Benefits Realization Management

Abbreviations and Acronyms

References

Index

Highlights

While most of the book focuses on showing us the tools to use and why, Part Three, Embedding the Practices, Chapter 11: Embedding Benefits Realization Management into Organizations, provides a plan that you can actually use to embed these practices into your organization without a great deal of rework of current processes.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Patt Chowdhury, MBA, MM, PMP

North Texas, USA

 

 

Patt Chowdhury, Managing Principal and Consultant at Patt Chowdhury Advisors LLC, is a marketing executive and cross-functional senior manager with extensive experience in program and project management, marketing operations, product management, process development and information technology at iconic, global Fortune 500 brands in the information technology and travel and transportation industries such as American Airlines, Sabre, EDS, Hewlett Packard and HPE. She is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Dallas Gupta College of Business where she teaches marketing and management courses in the MBA and MS programs. Patt is a PMP ® and a Six Sigma Black Belt. She is a member of the PMI Dallas Chapter where she serves as Director, Lunch and Learn Program Series, Manager of the Speaker Bureau and as a Facilitator Panelist for the PMP Exam Review. She holds an MBA in International Management, a Master of Management (MM) degree in Telecommunications Management, a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration – Marketing and a certificate in Product Management.

Patt can be contacted at patt.chowdhury@gmail.com or on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/pattchowdhury

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review who agree to provide a review within 45 days; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

Cognitive Readiness in Project Teams

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Cognitive Readiness in Project Teams: Reducing Project Complexity and Increasing Success in Project Management
Author:  Carl Belack, Daniele Di Filippo, Ivano Di Filippo
Publisher:  Routledge/Productivity Press
List Price:   $59.95
Format:  Hardcover, 224 pages
Publication Date:  February 2019
ISBN: 9781138592315
Reviewer: Susan E. Slawson, PhD
Review Date: June 2019

 


 

Introduction

The challenges that businesses face are increasingly complex. We have gone from simple and then complicated systems to the next level: complex systems. Most of the current approaches to project management are based on Newtonian/Cartesian principles, which work well for simple and even complicated projects. This book discusses a method of combining these principles and adding a neuroscience-based approach to human behavior and ambiguity to address complex systems using cognitive readiness.

Cognitive readiness was first developed by the US Department of Defense; its purpose was to train and develop leaders who were more focused, adaptive and responsive to changing battlefield conditions. Cognitive Readiness in Project Teams: Reducing Project Complexity and Increasing Success in Project Management explains a way to apply these principles to complex systems/projects in business. The goal is to reduce project complexity and increase the likelihood of project success.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book is a collection of chapters written by experts in fields such as project management, cognitive neuroscience and psychology, emotional and social intelligence, and mindfulness. Chapters range from complexity in projects, cognitive readiness, bias, mindfulness that leads to action, and emotional and social intelligence.

There are a significant number of resources (books, papers, studies, etc.) which are used to support the conclusions of the authors. This is, however, not an academic treatise; it is written so that it is easily understood by project managers and project teams. The supporting research strengthens the conclusions of the authors about the benefits of cognitive readiness.

Highlights

The authors explain the need for a new approach to handle increasingly complex projects. Simple and even complicated systems follow Newtonian and Cartesian logic; they are linear and the results are relatively predictable. More and more projects are now complex systems.

There is no universal definition of what a complex system is. However, it is generally accepted that a complex system is composed of many components which may interact with each other. Their behavior is difficult to model due to the many different types of inherent interactions, such as nonlinearity, emergence, spontaneous order, and feedback loops. Complex systems tend to be dynamic, chaotic and have far less predictable results and are governed by quantum mechanics. Cognitive readiness is introduced as an approach to address the complexity and increase the success rate for complex projects.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Susan E. Slawson, PhD

Carrollton, TX, USA

 

 

Susan E. Slawson, PhD, PMP, CSM, is an IT project manager with a distinctive blend of people, process and technology skills. She is committed to developing others through coaching and mentoring to help them excel. Creating order out of chaos is one of her top talents and she loves being a brand ambassador – promoting businesses to their customers.

Susan received her PhD from Carnegie Mellon University and promptly entered the workforce in management consulting. She has a varied background, including starting her own company and working for multiple industries such as professional services, healthcare, telecom, energy, financial services and retail. She currently works for Aprima Medical Software, an eMDs company. Susan is on the Executive Board for the non-profit DFW Alliance of Technology and Women (ATW) and is a member of both the Dallas and Fort Worth PMI chapters.

Susan can be contacted at SusanESlawson@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review who agree to provide a review within 45 days; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Data Analytics in Project Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Data Analytics in Project Management  
Edited by Seweryn Spalek
Publisher: CRC Press
List Price: $129.95
Format:  Hard Cover, 221 pages
Publication Date: 2018
ISBN: 978-1-138-30728-5
Reviewer: Richard Gower, PMP
Review Date:  June 2019

 


 

Introduction

Companies are managing increasing number of projects and these projects are generating extremely large amounts of data. Data Analytics in Project Management blends together the techniques and processes of data analysis with those of project management, providing value and insight for project managers, members of the project management office, and students of data analytics.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book is a collection of 15 to 20-page essays related to both data analytics and project management and does a good job of introducing data analytics to those responsible for managing projects. The editor has done an excellent job of finding a collection of authors each well qualified in their individual areas and minimizing the overlap of topics between chapters. Each chapter is separate and can be read independent of other chapters.

The book starts with a look at why we should use data analytics with project management (spoiler alert: it yields superior project outcomes) and discusses combining business data analytics with project management metrics and identifies the value that data analytics provides to the key players in an organization. The different types of data analytics are presented, and the authors describe a future of analytics tracking trillions of data points in real time and using Artificial Intelligence to devise appropriate strategies.

The book continues with a look at the risks associated with data analytics projects and then moves to a discussion on the analytical challenges of the modern PMO. The concept of project knowledge management highlights the importance for companies to properly manage the information from the many projects and portfolios and demonstrates the role of the PMO as a multilevel data analysis center. The chapter on data analytics and project portfolio management describes the different levels of analysis and suggests a five-step methodology for conducting analytics.

Subsequent chapters explain Earned Value Management, discuss how to manage the challenges of big data in the project environment, provide an overview of IT solutions of data analytics in project management, and look at the approaches to mining data for better decision making. The book finishes up looking at data analytics in agile project management and the alignment of agile software development principles and CRISP-DM, a model that describes the stages used to tackle data mining problems, and the challenges of combining data analytics with Scrum.

Highlights

The book presents several different perspectives of data analytics within the framework of project management and the individual chapters provide the reader with a good introduction to both data analytics and project management. The topics are presented with an assumption that the reader has little or no background in each subject and the chapters build on the basics with examples and references to other books and papers for further information.

The book provides a good background into how data analytics has progressed over time, defines the differences between descriptive, predictive and prescriptive data analytics, and lists how each can be used. It stresses how informed decisions are important, that the right decisions aid in successful outcomes, whereas poor decisions can send project teams in the wrong decision or allow the continuation of unjustified projects. It also discusses the different causes of bad decisions and provides a strategy for improving decision making. There are also very good discussions on the impact of big data on projects and data analysis.

The section on Earned Value Management is one of the best I have read with a very easy-to-follow explanation of earned value and the various calculations together with how to set up for EVM on a project, the progress measurement methods and potential pitfalls. As the authors point out, the biggest mistake is not setting up the project correctly to begin with; EVM is seldom successful as an afterthought.

More…

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About the Reviewer


Richard Gower

UK and Texas, USA

 

 

 

Richard Gower, PMP has worked in the software industry for over 30 years, specializing in software development, business intelligence and data analytics. His experience includes software development, business analysis, project management, and product development. He is a Project Management Professional and has a M.S in Data Analytics from the University of Texas San Antonio (UTSA). He is currently the VP of Technology for E.J. Ward.

Richard can be reached at https://www.linkedin.com/in/rchrdgwr/

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Alamo Chapter. Authors and publishers offer the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Investment-Centric Project Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:    Investment-Centric Project Management: Advanced Strategies for Developing and Executing Successful Capital Projects
Author:  Steven James Keays
Publisher: J. Ross Publishing
List Price: $69.95
Format:  Hardcover, 439 pages
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN:  9781604271423
Reviewer:  Denise Murray, PMP
Review Date: March 2019

 


 

Introduction

Investment-Centric Project Management is a treatise on the redefinition of project management. At the outset the author defines a project as the development of a Profitability Performing Asset which only ends when profit generation is realized. Taking into account today’s complex project environment, the book systematically recasts project execution methods and challenges the reader to make a mental paradigm shift regarding familiar PM methodologies. Project elements (networks, budgets, teams, et al) are approached from a unique perspective and prompt readers to question their own project management proclivities. With an extensive background in industrial projects the author takes the reader on a Jules Vern-type journey pioneering new project management methods.

Overview of Book’s Structure

A “who, what, when, where, why, how” formula is used to divide the book into parts—a fundamental formula to address project management fundamentals.  Starting with “why,” Mr. Keays presents his purpose, theory, key concepts/definitions and personal position on the value of investment-centric project management. The second “where” part offers innovative notions on the project environment, budget mindset, organizational structure, and the definition of success. The third part (“how”) is somewhat like a procedures manual addressing activity/event sequencing and life-cycle phases. In part four a “who” discussion touches on staffing strategies and tactics as well as personnel selection considerations. Part five (“when”) is the live-action section wherein the project is underway and the challenges inherent in project execution are broached.  The sixth “what” part wraps up the narrative by introducing tools and techniques in the context of project execution and closeout actions. Part seven is a collection of appendices, the bibliography and a lexicon.

Neologisms abound throughout the book (e.g., kyopia, directrix, valunomy/valunomic, misanger, and abdicratas) as well as acronyms—for which Mr. Keays provides definitions and uses.  A reader’s vocabulary may be expanded with uncommon words such as esemplastic, ukases, sedulous, and virulence (unless one already routinely uses these words). The liberal use of figures, formulas, diagrams, and tables help the reader grasp concepts the author strives to convey. Innovative concepts are the hallmark of the book. These concepts are employed as a means to:

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About the Reviewer


Denise Murray

San Antonio, Texas, USA

 

 

 

Denise Murray’s professional experience includes thirteen years in defense as a project manager and an acquisition manager; and ten years in higher education as faculty, and senior administrator. She is a Project Management Professional and has a M.S. in Project Management from the George Washington University. She is currently a Program Management Analyst for the U.S. Air Force in Texas.

She can be reached at ndamurray@gmail.com or www.linkedin.com/in/dnmurray98

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Alamo Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Agile Approaches on Large Projects

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title:  Agile Approaches on Large Projects in Large Organizations
Author:  Brian Hobbs and Yvan Petit
Publisher: Project Management Institute, Inc.
List Price: $14.97
Format:  Soft cover, 133 pages
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978-1-62825-175-3
Reviewer: Keith S Dever
Review Date: April 2019

 


 

Introduction

This book provides an interesting summary of an implementation problem set that is still evolving.  While agile approaches are doing well in their “sweet spot”, that is not the case for their implementation for large projects in large organizations.  The authors acknowledge at the beginning and end that they are likely leaving the reader with more questions than answers.  But they certainly lay out critical areas of context for implementation that will help the reader understand what they would face with implementing agile approaches in a large organization.

Overview of Book’s Structure

The book is laid out in a straightforward manner beginning with a short executive summary and an introduction to the study as a whole.  The study is designed to address agile approaches in terms of individual projects and the context in which they are carried out.  It also looks to provide insight into progress in scaling agile practices beyond single teams and single projects.

A literary review sets the stage by providing baseline definitions for agile practices and their benefits, insight into using agile at scale and the evolution of scaling frameworks, and finally a look at agile’s relationship with organizational culture and team approaches.  Next, the authors outline their methodology – a combination of case studies of six organizations and a survey.

The majority of the book follows with the results of the study.  To begin, the characteristics of the organizations studied are outlined in terms of context – public or private sector, size, primary activity and use of the agile approach.  Then comes a segment on the implementation of agile approaches in each organization.  A short section discusses front-end planning and architecture.  Next are results centering on the project organizations with an emphasis on team structure and roles.  Finally, tools and techniques and applicable scaling frameworks are covered.  The results conclude with a short portrait as provided by the results.

The authors complete their efforts with a short discussion segment covering team level, project level and the interaction between the project and the organization. Then they present their conclusion and remaining questions that deserve future research.

Highlights

The following are a few of my key takeaways from the book:

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About the Reviewer


Keith S. Dever

San Antonio, Texas, USA

 

 

Keith Dever is a transformational leader with a successful record of driving superior operations and demonstrated leadership ability in enabling rapid growth within organizations. His expertise lies in successfully creating and implementing strategic operational processes, coaching and developing employees, and managing technology programs and organization operations efforts to realize business operations improvements while overseeing a wide variety of operational responsibilities to ensure outstanding organizational oversight and optimize financial performance across a variety of industries. These include: client-facing program/project management and strategy transformation support, solution content development, business development and organization operations management, major business segment level financial management, budget development and oversight and policy and procedure reporting and control. And most recently, analytics and visualization, innovation and technology operations management for innovation services spaces, and propose/design/build/execute/operate cycles for technology centric spaces and events.

Keith can be contacted at Keith.dever1@gmail.com

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Alamo Chapter. Authors and publishers offer the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Alamo Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  PMI Alamo Chapter members can keep the books as well as claim PDUs for PMP recertification when their reviews are published. 

If you have read a good recently-published book related to managing programs, projects or teams of professionals, consider authoring a book review for publication in the PM World Journal.  For our standard format or for more information, contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com or visit https://pmworldlibrary.net/book-review-program/

If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact Editor@pmworldjournal.com.

 

 

Investment – Centric Project Management

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book Title: Investment – Centric Project Management: Advanced Strategies for Developing and Executing Successful Capital Projects       
Author:  Stephen James Keays MASc., P.Eng
Publisher:  J Ross Publishing
List Price:  $54.95
Format: Hardcover, 350 pages
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978-1-60427-142-3
Reviewer: Lauren Puglisi, MBA, CAPM
Review Date: April 2019

 


 

Introduction

The global statistics are staggering. Regarding industrial projects, 30% of $20M projects fail, 50% of $100M projects fail, and 70% of $1B projects fail. How can this be? The author, Stephen James Keays, with over 30 years of managing projects in aerospace, oil and gas, defense, and manufacturing, suggests that these failures are incongruent with the expected successful outcomes of the project management principles.  Mr. Keays offers three principal areas that may contribute to less than stellar results.

The first practice is the generally accepted mindset that cost control is the same as cost effectiveness. He calls this an illusion. Budget control through cost containment may lead to unanticipated technical trade-offs, which actually increase costs. Secondly, common practice evaluates each phase independently for budget and schedule. The progression of the phases assumes the cumulative impact of the end result. This is a flawed presumption since final performance cannot be evaluated by independent phases alone. Lastly, current thinking addresses risk as external factors that need to be managed. In reality, risk is inherent in each stage of the execution and is increased when stages are run in parallel.  As he addresses these three areas and many more, Mr. Keays introduces the reader to a paradigm shift for increasing success in the PM environment. He has named it Investment-Centric Project Management.

Overview of Book’s Structure

This book is divided into 7 parts: WHY, WHERE, HOW, WHO, WHEN, WHAT, and the final section which includes the appendices, bibliography, and lexicon. The parts are further divided into multiple chapters, each addressing a specific topic. The bibliography includes over 100 references from a variety of disciplines.

Highlights

The highlights consist of Why, How, and Who, three areas that dominate a project managers mindset.

Part 1, WHY, addresses the fact that although project management principles are a good foundation, high failure rates are a sign that something is unaccounted for. The author premises a distinction between the PMI definition of a project, “an agent of change, undertaken as a temporary endeavor to create a unique process, product, or service,” with his definition, “the development of a profitable performing asset or PPA.” The author ascertains that traditional projects, or “spend” projects, use a constraint trifecta of time, quality, and costs, and the overriding emphasis or strategy is to minimize costs. In contrast, the PPA strategy is to maximize performance and long-term ROI. This is not a spend project but an investment and must be governed differently.

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About the Reviewer

 


Lauren Puglisi

Texas, USA

 

 

Lauren Puglisi, MBA, CAPM is an accountant, project management professional, and business analyst with 20 years of experience in the real estate and civil engineering fields.

Lauren can be contacted at www.linkedin.com/in/laurenpuglisimba

 

Editor’s note:  This book review was the result of a partnership between the publisher, PM World and the PMI Dallas Chapter. Authors and publishers provide the books to PM World; books are delivered to the PMI Dallas Chapter, where they are offered free to PMI members to review; book reviews are published in the PM World Journal and PM World Library.  If you are an author or publisher of a project management-related book, and would like the book reviewed through this program, please contact info@pmworldjournal.com.