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Interview with Mark Dorsett

 

The Finish Line of a Project Is the Intended Benefits

Interview with Mark Dorsett

Executive Vice President
Prosci

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)
International Correspondent, PM World Journal

 

Introduction to the interviewee

Mark Dorsett, Executive Vice President of Prosci, is responsible for global business strategy and results through direct business and strategic partnerships / channel sales to extend Prosci’s ability to have successful clients across geographic markets and vertical industries. He grew revenue by over 300% in the first four years with a combination of organic expansion and acquisition. His demonstrated capabilities include setting strategy for client and business success, frequent international event speaking, business development & sales, partner strategy and management & strategic alliances, portfolio management and best practices, customer success and value realization, growth through acquisition and organic approaches, client management and governance and services delivery. He has demonstrated experience and success in working with people and organizations in countries throughout the globe with extensive time spent in China, Japan, India, Latin America, Eastern and Western Europe. He holds the following certificates: Prosci’s Train-the-Trainer, Prosci’s Change Management Certification and Prosci’s Change Practitioner.

At the 2019 PMI (China) Congress, Mark Dorsett made a keynote speech titled “How to Use Change Management to Achieve Project Success”, which was well-received among participants. After the presentation, we were so honored to do this interview with him.


 

Interview

Part 1: “I’m always involved in projects.”

Q1.      As a PM professional, how do you describe yourself to readers? Would you please explain your life motto “To enjoy life to the fullest and help others to do the same”?

Mark Dorsett (Dorsett):      I describe myself as someone who helps organizations achieve greater results. I have been in the professional services industry throughout my career; initially, I worked as a computer engineer, but I always had a focus on interacting directly with customers, getting to know them and what their goals and needs are. Coming back to the question, why projects? What I have found is that almost all changes are introduced in organizations in the form of projects. So, in that respect I am always involved in projects; sometimes as a sponsor and leader, sometimes in more of a PM role and sometimes as a participant.

My life’s motto is “To Enjoy life to the fullest and help others to do the same”. Perhaps at first glance that appears to be too inward focused, but I have found that as I develop myself, seek to always improve and enjoy what I do, I am then able to help others do the same. I get great satisfaction from coaching others and watching them develop and become successful and enjoy what they do.

Q2.      I noticed that you majored in Chemistry at University. So why did you turn to project management as your career?

Dorsett:     I chose Chemistry because I loved science and wanted to focus on a career in Medicine. However, after being accepted to Medical School, I discovered that it really wasn’t my calling. So, I took the technical skills and aptitude that I had and began working in the professional services area. Even now, I still find that obtaining a Chemistry degree really helped me develop the analytical thinking and problem-solving skills which are important in any discipline and any situation in life.

 

Part 2: “A project is successful when the intended goal is achieved.”

Q3.      You’ve worked across the globe. In terms of measuring project success, have you met differences in different countries?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: Yanjuan, Y. (2020). The Finish Line of a Project Is the Intended Benefits: Interview with Mark Dorsett; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue I, January.  Available online at  https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/pmwj89-Jan2020-Yanjuan-Mark-Dorsett-Interview.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review (PMR) Magazine and website. She has interviewed over sixty top experts in the field of project management. Before joining PMR, she once worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in training centers in Beijing. Beginning in January 2020, Spring will also serve as an international correspondent for the PM World Journal.

For work contact, she can be reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

To see other works by Yu Yanjuan, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/yu-yanjuan/

 

 

Interview with Andy Kaufman

 

Interview with Andy Kaufman

Award- winning Project Management & Leadership
Keynote Speaker, Author & Coach

Interviewed by Ipek Sahra Ozguler
International Correspondent
Istanbul, Turkey

Andy Kaufman, PMP is an international speaker, author, & executive coach, and President of the Institute for Leadership Excellence & Development Inc. Andy works with organizations around the world, helping them improve their ability to deliver projects & lead teams.

His keynotes, workshops, and executive coaching services have reached tens of thousands of people from hundreds of companies over the years, helping them deliver their projects, become more confident leaders, take focused action, and deliver results. He brings a rich background of over 25 years of experience in executive management, technology, team leadership, project management, consulting, coaching.

He is a certified trainer and author of “Navigating the Winds of Change: Staying on Course in Business & in Life”, “Shining the Light on The Secret”, and an e-book entitled “How to Organize Your Inbox & Get Rid of E-Mail Clutter”, all published by Zurich Press. He is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) and a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®).

He is the host of “The People and Projects Podcast” (http://PeopleAndProjectsPodcast.com or any podcast app) which provides interviews and insights to help listeners lead people and deliver projects. The podcast focuses on the intersection of People and Projects–where work gets done in the real world.

He is a recognized expert on topics related to leadership, project management, managing conflict, networking, relationships, time management, team-building, and delivering results.


 

Ipek Sahra Ozguler (Ozguler):    Andy Kaufman, thank you for accepting the interview invitation of the PMWJ. Could you please introduce yourself to our readers? Who is Andy Kaufman? What are your areas of expertise and how do you use them?

Andy Kaufman (Kaufman):     It’s a pleasure to join you for this discussion, Ipek! I started my career as a software developer and was promoted into management for all the wrong reasons! You know how this works, right? Someone is reasonably good at one job and we assume that they’ll be good at managing those sort of roles—it’s often called the halo effect. Anyway, after making plenty of mistakes, I grew to love leading teams. Over the years, I grew to be a Director, then Vice President of Systems. During that journey, I started speaking at conferences and ran into people who asked me to share the same messages at their companies. In 2001, I started a company that does training, keynote speaking, and executive coaching. I now spend most days helping people learn how to lead and deliver—it’s a joy that I never get tired of. And it’s an honor to work with leading companies around the world.

Ozguler:    You are the President of the Institute for Leadership Excellence & Development and help the organizations around the world improve the ability to deliver projects and lead teams. How do you achieve this?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

How to cite this interview: Ozguler, I.S. (2020); Interview with Andy Kaufman; PM World Journal, Vol. IX, Issue I, January.  Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/pmwj89-Jan2020-Ozguler-Interview-with-Andy-Kaufman.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Ipek Sahra Ozguler

Istanbul, Turkey

 

 

 

Ipek Sahra Ozguler graduated from the Istanbul University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. As a project manager, she has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014.

She has managed a variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), insurance (Euler Hermes), audit (Deloitte), telecommunication, ICT and aviation sectors and gained broader insights. In addition, she has worked as international correspondent for the PM World Journal since 2014.

Ipek is based in Isanbul and can be contacted at ipeksahra@gmail.com.  Her portfolio is published at the http://ipeksahra.strikingly.com/.

To view other works by Ms. Ozguler, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

 

Interview with Peter Taylor

 

Work Smarter and Not Harder

 

Interview with Peter Taylor

Author, Speaker and Trainer
Author of The Lazy Project Manager and other books

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)
International Correspondent for PMWJ

 

Introduction to the interviewee

Peter Taylor, Speaker, Author and Trainer, is most famous as the author of the book The Lazy Project Manager, an Amazon bestseller in the field of project management. His other books include The Thirty-Six Stratagems, Leading Successful PMOs, The Presentation on Presentations, The Project Manager Who Smiled, etc.

As a speaker, he is described as “perhaps the most entertaining and inspiring speaker in the project management world today”. He has made presentations to tens of thousands in nearly 30 countries.

He is also an experienced senior Program / PMO and transformation specialist with the ability to define overarching priorities and ensure project and program activity satisfies high level business objectives. His key strengths include: embedding robust governance to ensure successful delivery of £multi-million change programs and working with stakeholders throughout the project lifecycle to ensure delivery of tangible business benefits; introducing best practice processes aligned with an organisation’s culture and maturity. Working across multiple industries including Manufacturing, Health, Pharmaceuticals, FMCG, Aerospace and Finance.

Peter Taylor is based in the United Kingdom, but has readers, followers and fans worldwide.  Learn more about Peter at http://thelazyprojectmanager.com/peter-taylor

 


 

Interview

Part : “We can all learn from Chinese PM wisdom”

Q1.      It seems that you have a sound understanding of Chinese PM wisdom since you have published books titled “The Thirty-Six Stratagems”. What do you think we can learn from Chinese PM wisdom? How can Chinese PM wisdom help project management practice?

Peter Taylor (Taylor):    I really wouldn’t say that I have a sound understanding of Chinese wisdom but I was set a challenge by one of my publishers to write a modern day version of “The Thirty-Six Stratagems” and I loved the opportunity to read the original book, consider the messages and seek modern examples of the stratagems.

I definitely believe that we can all learn from Chinese PM wisdom, and Chinese wisdom in general. There is a calmness to such wisdom: deep consideration of contemplation and thought before action and this is what many project managers around the world keep forgetting. They are so busy with being busy that they don’t act in a good way by keeping in mind the long-term goals and objectives of the projects and rising above the day-to-day activities to assess the project’s health and progress. I’m not suggesting that you delay action but only that such action is considered, and options evaluated before moving on.

Q2.      Have you been to China? What’s your impression on project management practice in China?

Taylor:     Sadly no, I have never been to China, but I would love to have that opportunity. To see the country, meet the people, and speak at Chinese PM events and even deliver some training there would be amazing and a great experience for life.

I can’t really say too much about my impression of project management practice in China beyond reflecting that some of the most amazing engineering achievements have happened in China in the last 20 years and therefore project management must be well advanced in China…

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: Yanjuan, Y. (2019). Work Smarter and Not Harder: Interview with Peter Taylor; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue XI, December. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/pmwj88-Dec2019-Yanjuan-Interview-with-Peter-Taylor.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

To view other works by Ms. Yanjuan, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at https://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/yu-yanjuan/

 

 

 

Interview with Terri Knudson

 

Interview with Teresa (Terri) Knudson

2019 Board of Directors
Project Management Institute

Interviewed by Ipek Sahra Ozguler
International Correspondent
Istanbul, Turkey

 

Journalist’s Introduction

Teresa (Terri) Knudson, MBA, PMP, PgMP, PfMP, is senior director of Strategy Management Services (SMS) for a major for-profit area at the Mayo Clinic, the largest integrated nonprofit medical center in the world.  In this role she is responsible for the full spectrum of strategy services including planning, execution, and benefit measurement and delivery for the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP).  Prior to this role she was director for the Enterprise Portfolio Management Office (EPMO) for Mayo which she established in 2008.  The EPMO provides methodologies and standards, education, resources, consulting, systems and reporting to advance project, program and portfolio management (PPM).  Terri has served Mayo Clinic for more than 30 years in various business areas, including strategic planning, finance, information technology, audit, business management, and operations administration. During these assignments, she led some of the largest initiatives at Mayo Clinic, many earning Excellence in Teamwork Awards. Prior to joining Mayo Clinic, Ms. Knudson held positions at Deloitte and Cenex.

Ms. Knudson holds an MBA and Bachelor’s Degrees in accounting and computer science. She has obtained her Project Management Professional (PMP)©, Program Management Professional (PgMP)©, Portfolio Management Professional (PfMP)©, and is a certified board director. She is also a certified public accountant, is certified in change management, and has bronze and silver quality awards.

 


 

Ipek Sahra Ozguler (Ozguler):   Teresa Knudson, thank you for accepting the interview invitation of the PMWJ. Please introduce yourself to the PMWJ readers.

Terri Knudson (Knudson):  Thank you for this opportunity to participate in this PMWJ interview!

After securing degrees in both finance and information technology, I began my career in accounting, becoming a CPA. After a few years, I decided to change focus and pursue my interests in IT.  Interestingly, the combination of these two seemingly disparate skills sets ultimately led me to the Mayo Clinic and a career in which project management has played a defining role.

I have been at Mayo Clinic for almost 35 years. I’ve had a dozen different careers within Mayo Clinic as it has grown and changed over the years. It’s been a fascinating journey, and I enjoy helping serve patients around the world.

Ozguler:    Tell us about your relationship with PMI. How did it start? Where are you today?

Knudson:   My relationship with PMI is an exciting story. Over the course of my career here at Mayo Clinic, I’ve been involved in many different projects. About 14 years ago, I started hearing about the Project Management Institute and I met a PMP who shared some information about PMI.

What sparked my interest was when I was leading a major ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) implementation that was having some struggles. I was working with a consultant and they introduced me to project management. The framework and standards were immediately relevant to the work I was doing and served as a roadmap for navigating the complex strategic initiatives in which I was engaged.

Given the instant value this introduction to project management provided, I was anxious to learn more. As my knowledge expanded through my engagement with PMI, so did my perspective on how well-established project management practices could be applied across our organization to advance strategic objectives. As a direct result of my association with PMI, I recommended Mayo Clinic form our first EPMO, or enterprise portfolio management office.

Mayo Clinic leadership recognized that PMI is the international standard for project management and delivers tools, processes and approaches to complete projects. As a result, people throughout the organization were trained to secure a PMP certificate and it is now a requirement for all senior level project managers.

After establishing the EPMO, I become more involved in the local PMI chapter. Through this growing relationship with the organization, I was invited to join the PMI Global Executive Council. This opportunity further broadened my perspective, as I saw other organizations around the world dealing with the same issues as our teams. It was increasingly apparent how much value PMI provided in support of our professional objectives. I was able to interact with people who were contending with the same challenges that I was and that could provide innovative solutions based on their considerable expertise.

I was encouraged to become part of the PMI Board of Directors and was honored to be elected to the Board by our members. My first term concludes this year, and I was recently reelected for a second term, which will start in 2020.

Ozguler:    How did you become part of the Mayo Clinic, which is the first and largest integrated, non-profit medical practice group in the world?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

How to cite this interview: Ozguler, I.S. (2019); Interview with Terri Knudson; PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue XI, December.   Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/pmwj88-Dec2019-Ozguler-Interview-with-Terri-Knudson.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Ipek Sahra Ozguler

Istanbul, Turkey

 

 

 

Ipek Sahra Ozguler graduated from the Istanbul University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering and from Middle East Technical University with an MSc degree in Software Management. As a project manager, she has more than 10 years’ experience in various areas such as portfolio management, program management, project management, software management, business analysis. She became a certified PMP in January, 2012 and a certified SCRUM Master in 2014.

She has managed a variety of projects across manufacturing, defence, FMCG (Cola Cola), insurance (Euler Hermes), audit (Deloitte), telecommunication, ICT and aviation sectors and gained broader insights. In addition, she has worked as international correspondent for the PM World Journal since 2014.

Ipek is based in Isanbul and can be contacted at ipeksahra@gmail.com.  Her portfolio is published at the http://ipeksahra.strikingly.com/.

To view other works by Ms. Ozguler, visit her author showcase in the PM World Library at http://pmworldlibrary.net/authors/ipek-sahra-ozguler/

 

 

Interview with Shankar Sankaran

 

Interview with Shankar Sankaran, PhD

Professor of Organizational Project Management
University of Technology Sydney

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)

Introduction to the interviewee

Shankar Sankaran, PhD, is a Professor of Organizational Project Management at the School of the Built Environment, Faculty of Design Architecture and Building, University of Technology Sydney (UTS), in Australia. He teaches advanced-level subjects in the UTS Master of Project Management Course including aspects of organizational project management (governance, portfolio and program management) and systems thinking, and supervises doctoral students.

Shankar’s research focuses on organizational project management, megaprojects, project leadership, systems thinking and action research. He has received a number of research grants from various agencies to conduct research on project governance, megaprojects, project leadership, leadership in not-for-profit organizations, healthcare, action research, governance and ethics. The findings of his research have been published in more than 140 publications. He is a co-editor of the first book on research methods for project management, Novel Approaches to Organizational Project Management Research: Translational and Transformational, the first book on systems research, Guide to Systems Research – Philosophy, Processes and Practice; the first handbook on organizational project management, Cambridge Handbook of Organizational Project Management; and a co-author of Oranizational Project Management: Theory and Implementation.

Shankar is a member of the editorial boards of the International Journal of Project Management, International Journal of Managing Projects in Business and Project Management Research and Practice and Systems. He is the current President of the International Society for the Systems Sciences and founder of its Action Research SIG. He has also been on the board of PMI’s Global Accreditation Centre. He is its current vice-chair.

As a practitioner, researcher, professor, educator, author and speaker, Shankar has contributed to the development of project management in many ways. Let’s now find out more about his PM story.


 

Interview

Journey from Industry to Academia

Q1.      Why did you turn to academia after working for a long time in industry? Has the experience in practice served you well in academic research?

Shankar Sankaran (Sankaran):      Actually, I entered academia by accident. I had completed a PhD implementing a large-scale change in the project management operations of a Japanese multinational company, Yokogawa, in Singapore, using action research as my research methodology. I was a Technical Director of this firm and we set up a global engineering center in Singapore which needed a different model of working in projects. I left Yokogawa in 1999 when I migrated to Australia to set up my own software outsourcing business. When I went to live in Australia with my family, I visited Southern Cross University (SCU) to meet my doctoral supervisor Professor Alan Davies who introduced me to the university’s Vice Chancellor Professor Barry Conyngham. Barry asked me if I would like to teach in an MBA program as he wanted experienced operations managers from industry to teach SCU’s MBA students. I thought this was an interesting move and agreed to try it out for six months. I liked the work and stayed on and I have now been an academic for nearly twenty years. Working in academia has been an exciting and rewarding journey and has satisfied my curiosity about how theory and practice can work together. I am lucky to have been promoted from a Senior Lecturer to full Professor within fifteen years. I never thought I would become a Professor as I did not start my career as an academic. I have also been fortunate to have worked for five research grants and started my sixth recently and this has been very inspiring. I teach postgraduate students who have many years of experience in industry. My industry-linked research and my interaction with students from industry has kept me abreast of what is happening in the field.

Q2.      Do you have any life or work motto to share? What are the most fulfilling versus challenging aspects of your career?

Sankaran:      I believe in the philosophy of action research (http://www.aral.com.au/resources/aandr.html)  and its dialectical approach of acting and critically reflecting on the consequences of the action before acting again. Over the years, I have become more conscious about reflecting before acting when applying the plan-act-observe-reflect cycle of action research.

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this article: How to cite this interview: Yanjuan, Y. (2019). Project Management Has a Bright Future; Interview with Prof Shankar Sankaran; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue X, November. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/pmwj87-Nov2019-Yanjuan-Interview-with-Shankar-Sankaran.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be

reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

 

 

Interview with David Hillson

 

Risk Is Uncertainty that Matters

Interview with Dr. David Hillson

The Risk Doctor
London, United Kingdom

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)

 

Introduction to the interviewee

David Hillson (CMgr, FRSA, FIRM, FCMI, HonFAPM, PMI-Fellow) is known worldwide as “The Risk Doctor”. In his eyes, a doctor is a trusted professional who helps you when you have a problem that needs his expertise, especially if you’re not sure what’s wrong. That reflects his role very well. “Doctor” also introduces ideas of consulting, diagnosis, treatment, prevention is better than cure, and promoting wellbeing and health. The medical metaphor works for him on many levels.

David has a reputation as an excellent speaker and presenter on risk. His talks blend thought-leadership with practical application, presented in an accessible style that combines clarity with humour, guided by the Risk Doctor motto: “Understand profoundly so you can explain simply”.

He also writes widely on risk, with eleven major books, and over 100 professional papers. He publishes a regular Risk Doctor Briefing blog in seven languages to 10,000 followers; he has over 4000 subscribers to the RiskDoctorVideo YouTube channel. (www.youtube.com/RiskDoctorVideo).

Dr. Hillson has over 25 years’ experience in risk consulting and has advised leaders and organizations in over fifty countries around the world on how to create value from risk based on a mature approach to risk management, and his wisdom and insights are in high demand. He has also received many awards for his ground-breaking work in risk management over several decades, including “Risk Personality of the Year” in 2010-11, the PMI Distinguished Contribution Award.


 

Interview

Definition of Risks

Q1.      You’ve noted that risks are more than uncertain future events, so what is “risk” by definition in VUCA era?

David Hillson (Hillson):          I start with the idea that risk is “uncertainty that matters”. All risks are uncertain, but not all uncertainties are risks. Most uncertainties don’t matter, and the only ones that we need to consider are the ones that could affect our ability to achieve our objectives. Risks include events that might or might not happen in the future (for example, a key supplier might go out of business), but it also includes non-events, such as variability in tasks that we already plan to do (for example, a trial may take longer or shorter than planned), or ambiguity in key aspects of our projects (for example, we may not fully understand part of the client’s requirement). Variability and ambiguity are uncertainties that matter, but they are not uncertain future events.

There’s a lot of talk about VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity) as a framework for identifying and managing risk. VUCA was based on leadership models developed by Bennis & Nanus in 1985, and it was adopted by the US Army War College in 1987 to describe the world after the end of the Cold War. It’s since transferred to the business world, but I’m not a great fan of VUCA as I think it’s an incomplete framework, and it can limit our thinking about risk to just those four categories. But it does help people to think about other types of uncertainty, not just uncertain future events, so that’s a good thing.

Qualities of Risk Practitioners

Q2.      What qualities should project leaders have in order to deal with risks? You’ve said risk leaders need to “dance the TANGO”; what does it mean?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: Yanjuan, Y. (2019). Risk Is Uncertainty that Matters: Interview with Dr. David Hillson; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue IX, October. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/pmwj86-Oct2019-Yanjuan-Interview-with-David-Hillson.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be

reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

 

 

Interview with Chang Shucha

 

PM Is the Most Effective Way to Manage VUCA

Interview with Chang Shucha

Founder of Project Management Review

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)

 

Introduction to the interviewee

If you are interested in project management in China, there’s one name you can’t miss: Chang Shucha (English name: Jessica).

Chang Shucha is the founder of Project Management Review (PMR) magazine, a 4-year-old influential magazine with forward-looking and global perspectives. Besides publishing magazines, Chang Shucha is also in charge of other business units of PMR all-media platform such as PM book publication, PM training courses, PM conferences, etc. By means of various media forms, she builds a bridge between theory and practice, between China and the rest of the world.

She has played a prominent role in the rise of project management publication in China. Professor Wang Shouqing praised her as the person who understands publication most in the field of project management and the person who understands project management most in the field of publication.

Chang Shucha is also Deputy Secretary-General of the Project Management Research Committee (PMRC) of Chinese Society of Optimization, Overall Planning and Economical Mathematics, Executive Member of Beijing Project Management Association, and Research Fellow of Praxis Research Center (China).

Having worked in the field of publishing and media for over 3 decades, she keeps on learning all the time. In her colleagues’ eyes, she is a result-oriented enabling leader, who is flexible and good at empowering team members while sticking to the strategic goals. She is not only a media professional who helps spread project management but also a PM practitioner standing at the frontier of PM development.

On the 4th anniversary of PMR, we did an interview with Chang Shucha, in which she looked both back and ahead to share with us her unique insights and observations.


 

Interview

 

Part 1

About Media: From Product Strategy to Platform Strategy

Q1.      What’s your original intention of creating PMR? What are the driving factors behind establishing PMR all-media platform?

Chang Shucha (Shucha):        The original intention of establishing PMR is to create an innovative integrative publishing platform of project management, which is characterized by co-creation, sharing and win-win, to extend the value chain of publishing media, to provide professional PM knowledge services with the platform as the core, and to explore a new mode of integrative publishing in the mobile Internet era. Over the past four years, PMR has developed around this initial intention, which has never changed.

It had been my dream since over ten years ago to spread project management theory and practice, share the wisdom and achievements of project management, improve individual and organizational project management capabilities, and promote the development of project management across the globe by establishing an innovative integrative publishing platform focusing on project management based on the advantages of publishing media resources and project management resources. At the same time, I wanted to publish by jumping out of publishing so as to explore a new end-to-end knowledge service model based on the advantages of content resources, with the product platform as the core, and through the interaction and integration of traditional and new media. I agreed with what Wang Bin, chairman of CITIC Publishing Group, said in an interview with Publisher magazine: “If we open up the extension of publishing, we will see a new world.”

To be specific, the establishment of PMR all-media platform is mainly based on the following three considerations:

Firstly, to meet the needs of the new era and markets. In recent years, projects have become the greatest driving force for organizational, even social and economic development. Project management has also stood at the center of the management stage and as the most viable management concept and method to adapt to the new economic era, it has attracted unprecedented attention and has been widely adopted in many industries with remarkable efficiency such as in UHV power transmission and transformation projects. However, there was a lack of a high-level media platform for exchanging the latest achievements, methods, lessons and opportunities of project management in China. Therefore, the establishment of PMR integrative publishing innovative platform can meet the urgent need of the times, and it also has great social value and potential market value.

Secondly, to integrate resources, extend the value chain of publishing media, promote digital transformation in publishing, propel integrative publishing innovation, and achieve integrated operation benefits. The development of Internet and mobile Internet technology has greatly accelerated the speed of change of the content industry including publishing. With increasingly diversified media forms and communication modes and with the coexistence of paper, computer, mobile phone, iPad, e-books and periodicals, the integration of traditional and digital publishing is an inevitable trend. In order to realize integrated operation benefits, media publishing enterprises should shift from product strategy to platform strategy, from relying merely on the advantages of content resources to actively embracing the Internet and integrating new technologies, thus gradually developing into an integrated product manufacturer and a multi-dimensional knowledge service provider. Peter Drucker once said, “We are not able to control change but we can go ahead of it.”

Thirdly, to make more people and organizations understand project management, recognize the value of project management, apply project management, thus promoting individual and organizational project management level. Since I first came into contact with project management in 1999, I have fallen in love with it. Through active learning and conscious application at work, I have gradually realized the value of project management for work and life, and its value in achieving organizational strategy landing and in enhancing organizational competitiveness. I hoped that I had known project management in my college years, or even earlier so that I could have broadened my thinking earlier, enhanced my abilities more consciously, looked at problems at a higher level, improved my life and work efficiency and created more value for enterprises. So it is the basic starting point of PMR to introduce PM knowledge and methods (which I regretted not having come across earlier) to all kinds of organizations and professionals.

Q2.      PMR celebrated its fourth anniversary on July 26, 2019. Looking back on the past four years, how do you feel and what milestones impressed you most?

More…

 

 

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: Yanjuan, Y. (2019). PM Is the Most Effective Way to Manage VUCA. Interview with Chang Shucha; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue IX, October. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/pmwj86-Oct2019-Yanjuan-Interview-with-Chang-Shucha2.pdf 

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be

reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

 

 

 

Interview with Dr Penny Pullan

 

Engaging People Remotely Is a Real Challenge

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)

Journalist’s Introduction to Penny Pullan

Dr. Penny Pullan is an expert on developing leadership for virtual work and tricky projects. The majority of her work is with people in multinational organisations, who are grappling with tricky projects and programmes of change.

Based in the United Kingdom, she has worked with programmes as wide-ranging as running virtual summits and professional groups, certification of child labour in West African countries, supporting people who make insulin globally to work virtually effectively, the global implementation of SAP, introducing project techniques in the not-for-profit sector as well as ‘Project Management Excellence” training.

Dr Pullan co-authored A Short Guide to Risk Management with Ruth Murray-Webster and co-edited Business Analysis and Leadership with James Archer. Her specialties include project and programme management, business analysis, business process management, business change, risk management, leadership of change, virtual leadership, implementing strategy, etc.

In 2001, Dr. Pullan was scheduled to fly to the United States to attend the start-up meeting for a global project, but her business trip was delayed due to the 9·11 incident. She had to quickly learn to work with team members on projects remotely. Since then, Dr. Pullan has initiated research on virtual team management and written a book on this topic titled Virtual Leadership. In this interview with Dr. Penny Pullan, we mainly focus on virtual leadership.


 

Interview

Project Management in Penny’s Eyes

Q1.  What is it that has motivated you to stay for over two decades in this profession?

Dr Penny Pullan (Pullan):       I want to change the world and make it a little bit better than it would have been without me! Project management has helped me to do this and has also been a lot of fun. I don’t think that it is possible to be bored when you’re doing such a diverse and interesting job.

Q2.  You have so many labels on you such as speaker, author, consultant, director, etc. Which is your favorite role and why?

Pullan:             I love my job – which is a real mix of writing, speaking, working with people and running my own consultancy. For me, the key part that keeps me interested is the variety of what I do and the diverse people I mix with. Every day is different. Recently, I have worked in Paris with project managers from a medical devices company, in Southampton with people who are working on geospatial projects and remotely with researchers in the USA! In amongst these, I have had time to think and mull over the topics I’ve been asked to speak on to audiences around the world.

Q3.  Someone has described you as being passionate, goal-oriented and ambitious. How do you describe yourself as a professional?

Pullan:             I’ve noticed, as I get older, that I’m enjoying developing others as much as, or even more than, developing myself. There is something magical in getting alongside someone as their mentor and watching as they open up to new possibilities and then make them happen. So perhaps you can describe me as a mentor, keen to open up new possibilities and potential in all I work with.

Q4.  Having been in this profession for over 20 years, what changes in project management have you observed?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: Yanjuan, Y. (2019). Engaging People Remotely Is a Real Challenge: Interview with Dr Penny Pullan; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VIII, September. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/pmwj85-Sep2019-Yanjuan-Pullan-Interview.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be

reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

 

Interview with Harold Kerzner

 

Project Management Education Is a Life-long Quest

Interview with Harold Kerzner, PhD

Author, Professor, Director
International Institute for Learning

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)

Introduction to the interviewee

Harold Kerzner, PhD, Professor, author, is now Executive Director for Project Management at the International Institute for Learning (IIL). Having worked in the field of Project Management for more than 5 decades, he is definitely a witness of PM development.

He has written many books with the 60th one, Innovation Project Management, to be published later this year; he also lectures across the globe. His tremendous achievements have won a lot of recognition. Northeast Ohio Chapter of the Project Management Institute in the United States gives out the Kerzner Award once a year to one project manager in Northeast Ohio that has demonstrated excellence in project management. The Project Management Institute (International Organization) in cooperation with IIL has initiated the Kerzner International Project Manager of the Year Award given to one project manager yearly anywhere in the world that has demonstrated excellence in project management. The Project Management Institute also gives out four scholarships each year in Dr. Kerzner’s name for graduate studies in project management.

He gains satisfaction from what he has been doing. He keeps in contact with practitioners and insists on learning. As he said, expanding the latest PM thinking is where his passion lies.


 

Interview

Project Management Is Satisfying and Rewarding

Q1.      How would you like to describe the profession of Project Management?

Harold Kerzner (Kerzner):    There are very few professions in the world that provide workers with the satisfaction they can receive from project management. Most employees in a company, including project team members, may see and work on only a small component of the end result. They perform their job, perhaps in the earlier stages of a project, and may never see how their efforts contributed to the final result. The PM sees an idea drawn on a piece of paper being developed into a final product. The PM sees the entire picture and how everything must come together. Seeing the achievements of one’s work and knowing that you may have been responsible for this, is highly rewarding.

Q2.      What would you like to say to the newcomers in this profession?

Kerzner:        Project management is probably one of the best career choices you can make. In my view, it provides life-long satisfaction. Take advantage of every educational opportunity in project management. You will never be sorry.

 

Project Management Is “Leadership without Authority”

Q3.   What have you learned from early experience of working as a project manager? What’s your advice for future PMs?

Kerzner:        One of the first projects I managed had about 340 team members, of which I had some degree of control or authority over only about nine of them. Many of the team members were several pay grades higher than me, and yet I found myself in a position of having to provide them with some form of project leadership. What I learned very quickly was that project management is “leadership without authority.” PMs may have little or no direct authority over their team, may have no input into the team’s wage and salary performance reviews, may have no control over whom the functional managers assign to the project, may not be able to remove team members that are performing poorly without the participation of their functional managers, and cannot force team members assigned to multiple projects to work on their project in a timely manner. PMs of the future must learn that they will not always have the authority they expect or the ability to control worker performance through the wage and salary performance review process.

 

Project Management Was My Deliberate Choice

Q4.      You’ve been in this profession for more than 5 decades. Is project management an accidental or deliberate choice for you? What are the milestones in your career? In your eyes, what changes have happened in the field of project management?

More…

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: PMR (2019). Project Management Education Is a Life-long Quest: Interview with Harold Kerzner; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VII, August. Online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/pmwj84-Aug2019-Yanjuan-Interview-with-Harold-Kerzner.pdf


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be

reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

 

 

Interview with Bob Prieto

 

Program Management Is Anything but Simple

Interview with Robert Prieto

CEO, Strategic Program Management, LLC
Former Chair, Parsons Brinkerhoff
Former Senior VP, Fluor

Interviewed by Yu Yanjuan
Journalist, Project Management Review: PMR (China)

 

Introduction to the interviewee

Robert Prieto is now Chairman & CEO of Strategic Program Management LLC. As David Pells has said, he is one of the world’s preeminent authorities on the management of mega programs, large projects, construction management and the global construction industry.

Majoring in Science, he hasn’t received academic training in project management, which is an edge in his eyes as he is in a better position to challenge traditional project management to embrace changes and trends.

As the inventor of 4 issued patents, he is a scientist working in the field of project management.

As a distinguished practitioner, he has participated in numerous large and complex projects. He has taken up many industry roles such as Presidential Appointee of APEC Business Advisory Council and World Economic Forum – Engineering & Construction Governor.

For his work, he has been recognized by a number of awards such as Fellow of the Construction Management Association of America; CMAA Chairman’s Award.

 


 

Interview

Part 1: Program Management Requires Broader Strategic Focus and Tighter Integration

Q1. Please use several words / phrases to describe Program Management in your eyes.

Robert Prieto (Prieto):   In its simplest form, an organization’s strategic business objectives and desired outcomes are addressed through development of a comprehensive strategic plan. Program management is about translating that strategic plan into a defined set of discrete but interrelated activities (projects) and then managing the delivery and successful completion of these activities in a holistic way.

Program management is the process of providing execution certainty to meet the strategic business objectives of an owner.

Program management requires a broader, more strategic focus than project management and a tighter integration across all elements of the execution process, including:

  • Organizational enablement around clearly articulated strategic business objectives, that have been agreed to and will be continuously communicated
  • Program definition focused on needs vs. wants
  • Stakeholder outreach and engagement
  • Establishment of programmatic and technical requirements
  • Development of top-level execution strategies, schedules, and budgets reflecting the range of risks that the program could face
  • Risk planning and approach to risk management, including appropriate modeling of risks
  • Acquisition and contracting strategy, assessing risks, costs, schedules and logistics requirements, employing AI enabled supply chain tools where appropriate
  • Execution planning, with a heightened emphasis on the “flows” not just the activities
  • Implementation of an integrated management and support toolset, including select use of AI enabled insights
  • Program governance and oversight
  • Management and integration of defined projects, carefully understanding scope gaps not in the program’s purview and white space risks
  • Assessment of cost, schedule, quality, and health, safety, and environmental (HSE) metrics and forecast trends and key assumptions
  • Management and allocation of contingencies and ongoing risk assessment
  • Ongoing alignment and communication

But program management is anything but simple.

While many of the processes that one may employ resemble the practices of good project management, the focus is very different. Nowhere are these differences more clearly seen than in how the owner’s role shifts under program management delivery.

Q2. It’s common that people mistakenly understand programs as large projects. How will you describe the distinction between programs and projects?

Prieto:   There are many possible ways to describe the differences between programs and projects but let me take a simple approach.

Program management is the definition and integration of a number of projects to cause a broader, strategic business outcome to be achieved. It is not necessary for any or all of these projects to be large in their own right.

Program management is not just the sum of all project management activities but also includes management of the risks, opportunities, and activities that occur “in the white space” between projects. It also requires a heightened focus on the flows inside the project as well as those impacting the project from the outside.

While an individual project will employ a specific project delivery approach (design-bid-build, design-build, DBOM, etc.), program management may combine different delivery approaches across multiple projects to best achieve the desired strategic business objectives.

 

Part 2: Adequate Management Oversight Is Essential

Q3. In program management, how should program managers get the support of top management such as C-suite?

More…

 

To read entire interview, click here

 

Editor’s note: This interview was first published in PMR, Project Management Review magazine, China.  It is republished here with the permission of PMR. The PM World Journal maintains a cooperative relationship with PMR, periodically republishing works from each other’s publications. To see the original interview with Chinese introduction, visit PMR at http://www.pmreview.com.cn/english/

How to cite this interview: PMR (2019). Program Management Is Anything but Simple: Interview with Robert Prieto; Project Management Review; republished in the PM World Journal, Vol. VIII, Issue VI, July. Available online at https://pmworldlibrary.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/pmwj83-Jul2019-Yanjuan-Prieto-Interview.pdf

 


 

About the Interviewer


Yu Yanjuan

Beijing, China

 

 

 

Yu Yanjuan (English name: Spring), Bachelor’s Degree, graduated from the English Department of Beijing International Studies University (BISU) in China. She is now an English-language journalist and editor working for Project Management Review Magazine and website. She has interviewed over forty top experts in the field of project management. In the past, she has worked as a journalist and editor for other media platforms in China. She has also worked part-time as an English teacher in various training centers in Beijing. For work contact, she can be

reached via email yuyanjuan2005@163.com  or Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/yanjuanyu-76b280151/.

 

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